Jan 15

Grey Boy on Miami Soul Music & the Human Race

I’m basically happy with the way Savage Lost turned out, but it’s far from a perfect work.  It could desperately use an index.   It could use more pictures.  (My publisher said we had to keep it under 25 to avoid a higher cost.)   I would love to expand the Central Florida coverage, and include Pensacola and the Space Coast.  But above all, I realize I needed to stretch out the soul music coverage to include 1971, not just a cutoff of Summer 1970.

I know why I chose that time frame.  With the top local post-garage bands either leaving town or breaking up in 1970, it just seemed like the perfect spot to say “the 60s are over”.  But soul music, and funk in particular, did not follow that timeline.  Even as the local garage band scene was sputtering (recording-wise) by the time 1971 rolled around, we were just about to enter our golden age of funk 45s.  It wouldn’t last long, with disco waiting just around the bend, but those late Saadia releases and so many others really, really needed to be noted in the book.

One such 45 is “Grey Boy”/”Human Race” by a group calling itself Human Race.   It turns out that name was chosen for the record release, but the band was actually the Miami Soul Revue, a group with a long, soulful history.   “Grey Boy” was the nickname of the band’s sax player, Michael Edell, who shared some of his memories — and photographs — with this blog.   Thank you, Michael, for telling your story.

 

"Grey Boy", named after Michael's nickname

 

“My group was called the Miami Soul Revue. We were the house band at the Continental Club when it was taken over by Mr. Walters who ran a wig shop right across the street.

Our band was a virtual hotbed of tremendous talent.  Alfons Kettner (guitar) later co-wrote ‘What You Won’t Do for Love’ with Bobby Caldwell.  Ernie Wernecke (2nd guitar) toured with The Cornelius Brothers and Sister Rose.   I played sax, along with Demp Liptrott (KC & Sunshine Band) and Jo Jo Dames on trumpet (Frank Williams and the Rocketeers). Our drummer was Ty Walton, who previously played congas for the Packers (‘Hole in the Wall’).

The Miami Soul Revue cut a 45 at Tropical Records which is now a collector’s item.  We cut it under the name of The Human Race.   It is called ‘Grey Boy’.   I’m playing sax on the cut. The flipside was called ‘The Human Race’.  Butterball Smith used to play ‘Grey Boy’ all the time when he was promoting local events.

 

“The MSR opened as a 5-piece for James Brown at Miami Stadium.  Mr. Brown told us that we were some of the funkiest white boys he had ever heard and he entertained stealing Alfons because he was every bit as funky as Jimmy Nolan. I later went on the road with a wide variety of artists doing musical arrangements and playing sax (Cal Roberts, Joe Tex, many more) then made the SF Bay Area my home in the mid-70s, when I opened a music production company. We knew all the local cats – Little Beaver, Frank Williams, Jaco Pastorius, Frankie Seay and his brothers Larry (aka Lunch) and Jerry (Mothers Finest).

Here are a few pics from those days.   That’s me on the right with Vicki Anderson backstage at the Continental Club.

 

Me with Bobby Byrd

 

Me with William Bell and his guitar player Harold Bean.

 

Demp Liptrott, Sharon Robinson (vocalist), and Harold.

 

The Miami Soul Revue, backing the Reflections, a local Temptations cover band.

 

Backing Benny Latimore…

 

Me on stage

 

A photo of the Soul Children outside the Continental Club. We backed them at the club during their tour.

 

Me with Cal Roberts (Platters, Gospel Jazz Singers w Jesse Ferguson). That’s Jo Jo Dames on trumpet. He played on ‘I Feel My Love Coming Down’ and ‘Soul Stuff’ by Frank Williams and the Rocketeers featuring Little Beaver.  Photo taken at Newport 7 Seas Lounge.

 

Hope you enjoyed this little time capsule.”

 

I certainly did.    Thank you, Michael.  Now for a couple of notes:

The Reflections (pictured above) were also affiliated with Mr. Walters, and some pressings of their record show their name as the Swinging Reflections.  Vocalist Ira McCall Jr., (the son of WMBM disc jockey Rev. Ira McCall) gets co-writer’s credit.

Some pressings showed the group's name as the Reflections, while others showed them as the Swinging Reflections.

 

I worked with drummer Ty Walton at WNWS Radio from 1978 to 1980.   At that time he was the front man in the new wave band Tar & the Nicotines.   Sometimes Walton would come in late to work, coming straight from doing studio sessions.   One time he came in saying “Sorry, I was working with Bobby Blue Bland”.   How could I possibly be angry with him?

Now that you’re here, check out the OTHER POSTS in the Savage Lost blog.

 

 

Nov 13

Leon Russell Meets the Allman Brothers In 1966

The Spotlights from Daytona Beach, aka the Allman Joys

The Spotlights from Daytona Beach, aka the Allman Joys

Leon Russell came from Tulsa, Oklahoma, but one of his early endeavors featured two Florida legends — in their first-ever record release.  I remember, as a 9-year-old, hearing “Batman And Robin” by the Spotlights on the radio.   It reached #12 on WQAM and #13 on WFUN in my hometown of Miami, during the third week of February 1966.   What I didn’t know until recently is who the Spotlights were:  a group that would soon be known as the Allman Joys, featuring two brothers from Daytona Beach by the name of Gregg and Duane.

Introducing the Spotlights. Click image to view it full size.

Introducing the Spotlights. Click image to view it full size.

 

Producer Snuff Garrett had the idea of creating an album of songs based on cartoon and comic book characters.  Garrett was coming off a great year, with several top ten hits as the guiding force behind Gary Lewis & the Playboys.   His musical director at the time was Leon Russell, who wrote and played on many Gary Lewis hits (including that memorable keyboard riff in “Everybody Loves A Clown”.)   According to Russell’s Tulsa cohort, J.J. Cale, Russell and Garrett recruited a group of musicians to record in New York, with the Spotlights being chosen as part of the entourage.  In a 1982 interview, Cale shared some of the details behind the project:   “Leon, Snuff , and I went up to New York City to cut this album. I was sitting in one room writing songs. Leon was in the studio leading the musicians, and Snuff was coming and getting the songs from me. He’d come in and say, ‘Write a song about Little Orphan Annie,’ and I’d start writing the song in the room and he’d take it into the studio where Leon would get all the musicians to play it. It was wild.”

 

One of three covers for the Super Dupers LP, featuring, among others, Leon Russell and Duane & Gregg Allman

One of three covers for the Super Dupers LP, featuring, among others, Leon Russell and Duane & Gregg Allman

 

“Little Orphan Annie” wound up being released as the Spotlights’ second single, on the B-side of Cale’s “Dick Tracy”.   All the tracks from the New York sessions turned up on an album called The Superrecord of Superheroes by the fictional group the Super Dupers.  The album didn’t credit the Spotlights, or any of the musicians.  The Super Dupers LP came out on two different record labels, with at least three different covers.   No one could have ever imagined back in early 1966 that several future superstars were taking part in such a humble, disposable project.  Who knew?

The Allmans would cross paths with Russell again, though a mutual association with Delaney & Bonnie & Friends.  Gregg Allman and Leon Russell teamed up once more in 2011, joining Elton John in concert at Madison Square Garden.  It’s entirely possible that they may have reminisced backstage about the first time they worked together — on an obscure children’s album — and a song about the Dynamic Duo that started a Florida legend’s recording career.

(Some of the information for this blog post came from www.duaneallman.info)

 

Now that you’re here, check out the OTHER POSTS on the Savage Lost blog.

 

Jul 07

WLOF & Bill Vermillion: Florida Top 40 Legends

billvermillion2

Bill Vermillion, as depicted on a 1969 WLOF survey

Most people are content to follow.   It’s lonely out there leading the way, especially when you hear something, or just know something that others simply don’t understand.  It was that way for Bill Vermillion, the visionary music director of WLOF in Orlando, a guy who wasn’t content with playing or programming just the proven hits of the day.   Vermillion was a hit maker — a guy who trusted his ears, and wasn’t afraid to be wrong.   That’s a key point.  Visionaries aren’t afraid to be wrong.   They put their reputations out there, and usually aren’t recognized as vanguards until many years after the fact.

When Bill Vermillion died in 2008 I think he knew he had made his mark in the city that he called home.  The fact is, no other station did things quite the way WLOF did.  Vermillion was part of a network of smaller-market (at the time) Florida programmers that  sometimes compared notes — Ike Lee at WAPE, Johnny Dark at WYND, and Bob Dennis at WUWU, among them.   Breakouts at these stations got the attention of Florida’s radio powerhouses, such as WQAM, WFUN, WALT, and WLCY — and in the case of WLOF, some of the breakouts stretched way beyond our humble peninsula.

From late 1965 through early 1972, WLOF charted around 600 (!) songs that failed to reach the Billboard Hot 100.  That’s a staggering amount.   But you can probably count almost as many songs that WLOF jumped on early that became bona fide smashes.  In some cases, Vermillion and WLOF were the very first in the nation to program these songs.

Topping the list is “Dirty Water” by the Standells.  Here’s what Bill Vermillion wrote about that 1966 garage band classic, a few years prior to his death:

“I’m responsible for it in the first place.  It was about six weeks old and a B-side when we broke it out of Orlando, where it went to #1 on both top 40 stations (WLOF and WHOO) with NO copies for sale anywhere.  The phones were constantly asking for it.  It was the only time in my career where we had a #1 record with no sales.

The Miami distributor, Campus, realized it was a hit when the biggest trans-shipper, Tone, called them up and offered $300 CASH for 1,000 copies.  And Tone never paid cash for anything.”

Bill Vermillion received this super-cool clock as a thank you from Tower Records, for being the first to believe in "Dirty Water".

Bill Vermillion received this super-cool clock as a thank you from Tower Records, for being the first to believe in “Dirty Water”.

 

Elton John's first U.S. single was played as an extra by WLOF in early 1969.  Note the giant "E" sticker, which stood for "extra".

Elton John’s first U.S. single was played as an extra by WLOF in early 1969. Note the giant “E” (extra) sticker.

There were many, many more hits that got their first plays on WLOF — and they cover many different styles of music.  “Along Comes Mary” by the Association, “Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison,  “Itchycoo Park” by the Small Faces,  “Love Theme From Romeo and Juliet” by Henry Mancini, and “Chick-A-Boom” by Daddy Dewdrop are just five.  Hit artists such Canned Heat and Grand Funk Railroad owed a lot of their success to Vermillion.  WLOF was the first AM station in America to play the Mothers of Invention, way back in August 1966.  David Bowie charted on WLOF in June 1967;  Elton John, who wouldn’t break through for another year and a half, got airplay back in January and February of 1969 with “Lady Samantha”.  WLOF was also the first American station on which Jimi Hendrix scored a number one hit.   From the Mothers and Hendrix, to Henry Mancini and Daddy Dewdrop!   That was Vermillion.  That’s the type of variety that made the golden age of Top 40 radio so amazing.

 

Appreciation from Capitol Records and Grand Funk Railroad:  just one of many awards for helping to break future hit records

Appreciation from Capitol Records and Grand Funk Railroad:  just one of many awards for helping to break future hit records.  Click the image to view it full size.

 

Yet not everything Vermillion touched turned to gold.  There were many other great records that were heard on WLOF that didn’t cause a whimper outside the Orlando area.  In the next installment, I’ll be noting hundreds upon hundreds of songs that were listed on the Channel 95 survey that completely missed the Billboard Hot 100.   It is a remarkable list… and I don’t use that word lightly.

Jul 07

600 WLOF Chart Hits That Missed the Hot 100

Music Director Bill Vermillion, playing the hits -- and the "should have been hits" on WLOF Radio

Music Director Bill Vermillion, playing the hits — and the “should have been hits” on WLOF Radio. Photo from Dick Camnitz & cflradio.net.

 

Anyone who sees Bill Vermillion as just another music director, or WLOF as just another Top 40 station, probably sees the Beatles as just another pop group, or Muhammad Ali as just another boxer.  WLOF played the hits, but constantly kept things moving so that local records and anything else that sounded great could get played.  Songs tended to stay on the station’s survey for a shorter period of time than most, but that doesn’t mean they then faded into oblivion.   Here’s how Vermillion explained it, a few years before his death.

“At WLOF we figured that if a song got into our “A” rotation — basically the top 10 — it should be kept in airplay, not hidden away for months on end.  So once it went from the “A” stack, it went to the “D” stack.  We played one “D” record per hour, and I don’t recall how long a record stayed in “D” — it was somewhere between 4 and 8 weeks.   Once out of “D,” it went directly to the oldies “file cabinet” (it was a standard 4-drawer file cabinet, with the oldies filed by first letter.)  There were probably 2500 oldies in that cabinet, right next to the jock… and they could pick anything they wanted.”

Take a moment to ponder that last thought.   WLOF kept around 2500 oldies in their file cabinet.   Tight playlists?   Not on your life!   Once “A” rotation songs moved to the “D” file, that cleared space for Vermillion’s new discoveries.   Some would become smash hits;   others would miss completely.  The list of songs that were charted by Vermillion and WLOF between late 1965 and early 1972 is simply staggering.   As you peruse the list that follows keep a few things in mind:

— Only records that missed Billboard’s Hot 100 are listed here.   That means some great garage and psychedelic classics that made the station’s top 10 — from “It’s-A-Happening” by the Magic Mushrooms (#6 on 11/5/66), to “The Little Black Egg” by the Nightcrawlers (#2 on 10/29/65), to “Not So Sweet Martha Lorraine” by Country Joe and the Fish (#4 on 7/29/67) — won’t be found on this chart.

–What about the 13th Floor Elevators, Clefs of Lavender Hill, Davie Allan & the Arrows, and those other great WLOF charters that aren’t on the list?   Sorry, they made the Billboard Hot 100.

— Records that “bubbled under” the Billboard Hot 100 are included.   Obviously, a song that only reached #117 or so is NOT a hit record, and therefore it’s worth noting that WLOF gave it a spot on its 40-song chart.

— This list is limited to songs that missed the Billboard Hot 100.   Chart positions in Cashbox and Record World were not taken into consideration at this time.   Perhaps at a future date…

–WLOF played  many, many extras that never hit their actual printed surveys.  Only songs that were assigned a number and appeared on printed charts are included here.  I do plan to publish a list of some of the local records that were played as extras, but at a later date.

–I have very few WLOF surveys from prior to October 1965.  I would love copies of any older WLOF charts that anyone might have.   If enough older charts surface, I’ll be glad to update this list to include those earlier charted songs.   It would also be great to do a similar list for rival station WHOO, but right now I don’t have nearly enough surveys to do such a project justice.

Now here’s that list, sorted by artist, title, peak position, and date of peak position.   Artists whose names are followed by an asterisk were based in Florida, though not necessarily in Central Florida.  This list took months to compile, so when quoting information from it, please give a shout out and link to this site.

 

 

DICK ADDRISI EXCUSE ME 22 8/19/1966
AFRICA FROM AFRICA WITH LOVE 27 2/27/1970
JEWEL AKENS LITTLE BITTY PRETTY ONE 17 11/11/1967
STEVE ALAIMO* HAPPY 9 8/12/1966
STEVE ALAIMO* MY FRIEND 26 7/13/1968
STEVE ALAIMO* NEW ORLEANS 19 9/9/1967
STEVE ALAIMO* ONE WOMAN 38 9/13/1969
STEVE ALAIMO* PARDON ME 22 12/9/1966
STEVE ALAIMO* YOU DON’T KNOW LIKE I KNOW 25 4/29/1967
NANCY AMES FRIENDS & LOVERS FOREVER 8 1/11/1966
PAUL ANKA POOR OLD WORLD 36 1/20/1967
PAUL ANKA WHY ARE YOU LEANING ON ME SIR 39 4/23/1971
PETE ANTELL THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGING 32 10/22/1965
ASSOCIATION BIRTHDAY MORNING 7 6/8/1968
ASSOCIATION P.F. SLOAN 27 4/16/1971
ASTRONAUTS THE LA LA LA SONG 2 10/15/1965
AVANT-GARDE YELLOW BEADS 29 12/23/1967
BACK PORCH MAJORITY SECOND-HAND MAN 8 5/27/1966
KENNY BALL WHAT BECAME OF LIFE 40 1/21/1966
BALLANTRAES BABY JANE 28 11/17/1967
BANANA SPLITS WE’RE THE BANANA SPLITS 22 11/9/1968
BANCHEE TRAIN OF LIFE 38 5/22/1970
BARDS NEVER TOO MUCH LOVE 18 1/2/1968
BARONS* DRAWBRIDGE 28 10/7/1967
CHRIS BARTLEY BABY I’M YOURS 18 3/14/1969
BEATLES YOU’RE GONNA LOSE THAT GIRL (LP CUT) 2 10/8/1965
BEATLES BOYS/KANSAS CITY 6 11/12/1965
BEATLES RUBBER SOUL ALBUM 1 12/24/1965
BEATLES SGT. PEPPER LP (LP CUTS) 12 7/9/1967
BEATLES I WILL (LP CUT) 30 8/29/1969
JEFF BECK HI HO SILVER LINING 25 5/20/1967
BECKETT QUINTET (IT’S ALL OVER NOW) BABY BLUE 26 10/22/1965
BEETHOVEN SOUL THE WALLS ARE HIGH 27 8/19/1967
BELFAST GIPSIES GLORIA’S DREAM 16 9/30/1966
MADELINE BELL STEP INSIDE LOVE 27 2/14/1969
BERKELEY KITES* HANG UP CITY 30 2/17/1968
BERRYS MIDNIGHT HOUR 1 5/27/1967
BHAGAVAD-GITA LONG HAIR SOULFUL 35 11/3/1967
BIG BROTHER & HOLDING CO. WOMEN IS LOSERS 37 12/23/1967
BIRDWATCHERS* GIRL I GOT NEWS FOR YOU 8 5/20/1966
BIRDWATCHERS* I’M GONNA DO IT TO YOU 23 12/23/1966
BIRDWATCHERS* I’M GONNA LOVE YOU ANYWAY 5 9/16/1966
BIRDWATCHERS* IT’S TO YOU I BELONG (MARY MARY) 32 3/2/1967
BLACK OAK ARKANSAS LORD HAVE MERCY 27 9/17/1971
OTIS BLACKWELL JUST KEEP IT UP 38 10/23/1970
JACK BLANCHARD & MISTY MORGAN* BIG BLACK BIRD (SPIRIT OF OUR LOVE) 37 2/7/1969
JACK BLANCHARD & MISTY MORGAN* YOU’VE GOT YOUR TROUBLES 23 10/23/1970
BLIND FAITH CAN’T FIND MY WAY/PRESENCE OF LORD 29 8/29/1969
BLODWYN PIG SUMMER DAY 20 2/20/1970
BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS COWBOYS AND INDIANS 22 11/19/1971
BOBBY BLUE RIDE WITH ME, BABY 24 4/29/1969
BLUE MINK BANNER MAN 34 8/20/1971
BLUES IMAGE* LAY YOUR SWEET LOVE ON ME 39 11/28/1969
BOCKY & THE VISIONS I’LL GO CRAZY 33 10/1/1965
DAVID BOWIE RUBBER BAND 33 6/24/1967
BOYS NEXT DOOR SEE THE WAY SHE’S MINE 31 5/16/1967
BRAM RIGG SET I CAN ONLY GIVE YOU EVERYTHING 3 5/9/1967
LARRY BRIGHT I SAW HER STANDING THERE 15 12/17/1971
PARRISH BROXTON BE THERE BABY 39 1/27/1967
TONY BRUNO I’VE GOT ENOUGH HEARTACHES 33 6/11/1971
BUBBLES AND CO. UNDERNEATH MY PILLOW 8 9/3/1965
BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD UN-MUNDO 25 5/4/1968
BUNCHES ‘A GOOD SEE THE FARMER 34 7/13/1968
ERIC BURDON & WAR MAGIC MOUNTAIN 25 6/19/1970
BUTTERMILK BOTTOM DEAR MR. FANTASY 39 11/20/1970
BYRDS CHANGE IS NOW 25 11/25/1967
CAMPERS THE BALLAD OF BATMAN 25 3/4/1966
CANNED HEAT POOR MOON 27 9/13/1969
CANNED HEAT ROLLIN’ & TUMBLIN’ 26 7/29/1966
CAPREEZ ROSANNA 8 11/18/1966
CARPENTERS YOUR WONDERFUL PARADE 32 12/26/1969
CARR & COMPANY HEY ANNIE 39 4/7/1972
CASCADES TRULY JULIE’S BLUES 8 6/10/1966
CASHMAN PISTILLI & WEST BUT FOR LOVE 39 4/20/1968
CASTLE CREEK I CAN MAKE IT BETTER 39 7/23/1971
CASUALS JESAMINE (A BUTTERFLY CHILD) 1 12/2/1968
CELEBRATION SWEET SUNDAY 34 1/22/1971
CHAKRA LITTLE WHEEL SPIN & SPIN 33 10/30/1970
BARBARA CHANDLER PRETTY SHADE OF BLUE 40 8/17/1968
CHICAGO PROHIBITION – 1931 THE BALLAD OF BONNIE & CLYDE 7 3/9/1968
CHRISTIE HERE I AM 30 3/5/1971
CITIZEN KAINE KICKIN’ STONES 40 8/22/1969
CLARE SAUNDERS FERRY LANE 39 10/15/1971
CLASSICS POLLYANNA 6 10/14/1966
CLEAR LIGHT BLACK ROSES 32 12/2/1967
CLEE-SHAYS THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. 1 5/20/1966
WAYNE COCHRAN* GET DOWN WITH IT 4 6/3/1966
COLLAGE THE STORY OF ROCK & ROLL 28 6/29/1968
RAY COLUMBUS & THE INVADERS SHE’S A MOD 33 12/10/1965
COMMAND PERFORMANCE DON’T KEEP ME BEGGING FOR YOUR LOVE 29 9/19/1970
COMMITTEE CALIFORNIA MY WAY 6 11/11/1967
COMSTOCK LTD. I WAS MADE TO LOVE HER 15 1/29/1971
CONJUR SHA SHA NAY 39 8/6/1971
CONLON & THE CRAWLERS* I WON’T TELL 19 4/14/1967
CONVENTION HEY THERE, LITTLE MISS MARY 39 8/10/1968
RUTH COPELAND HARE KRISHNA 18 7/2/1971
MIKE CORBETT & JAY HIRSH GYPSY CHILD 39 7/9/1971
CORNERSTONE HOLLY GO SOFTLY 30 5/22/1970
COUNT FIVE MAILMAN 3 7/18/1969
COUNT FIVE PEACE OF MIND 21 12/30/1966
COUNT FIVE YOU MUST BELIEVE ME 5 4/22/1967
PETER COURTNEY THE LOSER 38 3/3/1967
JOEY COVINGTON BORIS THE SPIDER 29 6/19/1967
COWSILLS MOST OF ALL 26 8/26/1966
CREAM I FEEL FREE 37 12/9/1967
CREAM SPOONFULL 14 11/4/1967
CREAM STRANGE BREW 3 9/23/1967
CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL BORN ON THE BAYOU 38 6/20/1969
CRITTERS MARRYIN’ KIND OF LOVE 18 3/18/1967
CROW TIME TO MAKE A TURN 38 7/25/1969
CRYAN’ SHAMES GREENBURG, GLICKSTEIN, CHARLES, ETC. 13 11/16/1968
MIKE CURB CONGREGATION TAKE UP THE HAMMER OF HOPE 39 3/24/1972
CURTAIN CALLS SOCK IT TO ME SUNSHINE 33 5/18/1968
SONNY CURTIS ATLANTA GEORGIA STRAY 19 2/24/1968
CUSTER’S LAST BAND* ANOTHER YEAR 28 7/13/1968
DADDY DEWDROP FOX HUNTING 31 7/23/1971
DAMNATION FINGERS ON A WINDMILL 38 9/2/1971
JOHN DAVIDSON VISIONS OF SUGARPLUMS 28 4/27/1968
RUSSELL DEAN IT TOOK A LONG TIME 38 12/3/1971
DEEP SIX RISING SUN 25 12/17/1965
DEFINITIVE ROCK CHORALE MIRRORS OF YOUR MIND 11 11/25/1967
DEL-VETTS LAST TIME AROUND 10 9/30/1966
JOHN DENVER STARWOOD IN ASPEN 32 12/3/1971
TRACEY DEY HANKY PANKY 13 5/28/1965
NEIL DIAMOND HANKY PANKY 17 1/22/1968
DICK AND DEEDEE WHEN BLUE TURNS TO GREY 7 5/14/1965
BOBBY DIMPLE AMERICAN MOON 25 1/9/1970
DINKS NINA-KOCKA-NINA 29 12/17/1965
DISTANT COUSINS SHE AIN’T LOVIN’ YOU 31 10/21/1966
DR. WEST’S MEDICINE SHOW & JUNK BAND GONDOLIERS, SHAKESPEARES, ETC. 38 3/21/1967
DICK DODD LITTLE SISTER 5 12/2/1968
DOO-RIGHTS YOU’RE MY GIRL 24 11/4/1967
RONNIE DOVE CHAINS OF LOVE 30 4/3/1970
RONNIE DOVE WHAT’S WRONG WITH MY WORLD 24 3/21/1969
NEAL DOVER MR. BUS DRIVER 27 2/20/1970
DOZY, BEAKY, MICK & TICH TONIGHT TODAY 28 8/7/1970
DREAM MERCHANTS RATTLER 14 9/11/1967
JOHNNY DUNCAN HARD LUCK JOE 28 8/19/1967
“E” TYPES SHE MOVES ME 13 1/6/1967
RANDY EDELMAN GIVE A LITTLE LAUGHTER 34 9/10/1971
JONATHAN EDWARDS TRAIN OF GLORY 26 4/14/1972
DONNIE ELBERT WITHOUT YOU 39 5/20/1969
ELECTRIC PRUNES DR. DO-GOOD 32 6/24/1967
ELECTRIC RAGTIME BAND RIGHT STRING BUT WRONG YO YO 32 10/15/1971
LORRAINE ELLISON I DIG YOU BABY 29 1/28/1966
EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER STONE OF YEARS 31 9/17/1971
ETERNITY’S CHILDREN RUMORS 20 10/14/1967
EVER-GREEN BLUES MIDNIGHT CONFESSIONS 38 1/13/1968
BETTY EVERETT THE REAL THING 20 5/14/1965
EVERYDAY PEOPLE* SPRINGTIME FOLLOWS THE SNOW 37 12/25/1970
EVIL* WHATCHA GONNA DO ABOUT IT 29 6/17/1967
EXCELS GONNA MAKE YOU MINE, GIRL 23 11/4/1966
EYE-FULL TOWER CAROL CARTOON 30 5/9/1967
EYES OF BLUE YESTERDAY 38 9/28/1968
GEORGIE FAME & BLUE FLAMES LIKE WE USED TO BE 26 9/3/1965
FABULOUS FARQUAHR ST. THERESA’S EAST RIVER ORPHANAGE 39 3/4/1968
MARIANNE FAITHFULL MORNING SUN 23 5/28/1965
FANTASTIC GROUP* (aka THE GROUP) LAND OF LAKES 32 8/5/1967
CHRIS FARLOWE PAINT IT BLACK 20 12/2/1967
FEATHERS TRYIN’ TO GET TO YOU 23 7/16/1968
FINDERS KEEPERS FRIDAY KIND OF MONDAY 15 5/4/1968
FIVE CARD STUD BEG ME 18 4/22/1967
FIVE EMPREES GONE FROM MY MIND 21 12/16/1966
FLASH & THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS BUSY SIGNAL 30 4/8/1968
FLASH & THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS I PRAY FOR RAIN 2 2/12/1968
FLIRTATIONS GIVE ME LOVE, LOVE, LOVE 37 7/9/1971
FLOWER POWER* I CAN FEEL IT 21 8/26/1967
FLOYD & JERRY & the COUNTERPOINTS SUMMER KISSES 10 9/2/1966
FLUDD TURN 21 39 11/12/1971
FORTUNES THE IDOL 26 10/7/1967
FOUNDATIONS STONEY GROUND 15 3/3/1972
FOUR SEASONS BETRAYED 13 5/14/1965
KIM FOWLEY STRANGERS FROM THE SKY 35 4/29/1967
CLAIRE FRANCIS OUR OWN THING GOING 36 5/6/1967
DALLAS FRAZIER JUST A LITTLE BIT OF YOU 25 7/15/1966
JOHN FRED & HIS PLAYBOY BAND AGNES ENGLISH 7 8/12/1967
FRIEND AND LOVER CIRCUS 39 2/7/1969
DAVID FRYE RICHARD NIXON SUPERSTAR LP 11 1/21/1972
GAP* SHERIFF 35 6/13/1969
GENE AND DEBBE MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS 34 2/21/1969
GENE AND TOMMY RICHARD AND ME 39 10/14/1967
GENESIS ANGELINE 16 6/18/1968
GENTRYS A WOMAN OF THE WORLD 17 10/7/1966
GENTRYS I CAN’T GO BACK TO DENVER 30 5/18/1968
GERRY AND THE PACEMAKERS AWAY FROM YOU 24 5/28/1965
SKIP GIBBS THE CHOKIN’ KIND 39 12/16/1967
GIGI DON’T BE A LOSER BABY 32 10/28/1966
GIORGIO FULL STOP (aka STOP) 12 11/25/1966
DICK GLASS YOU CAN’T STOP TOMORROW 26 5/13/1966
SUZANNE GODDARD* ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN 36 9/3/1965
GOLDEN GATE DIANE 18 2/27/1970
GOLDEN TOADSTOOLS SILLY SAVAGE 21 7/8/1968
LESLEY GORE HE GIVES ME LOVE (LA LA LA) 18 6/22/1968
DON GRADY THE CHILDREN OF ST. MONICA 11 2/24/1967
GRAND FUNK RAILROAD PEOPLE LET’S STOP THE WAR 29 12/10/1971
GRASS ROOTS MR. JONES (BALLAD OF A THIN MAN) 27 10/29/1965
DOBIE GRAY ROSE GARDEN 30 5/13/1969
GREAT JONES CRIPPLE CREEK 18 2/26/1971
LORNE GREENE SAND 5 5/14/1965
JAMES ARTHUR GRIFFIN THE MIRACLE WORKER 31 5/27/1967
GUESS WHO FRIENDS OF MINE 9 7/30/1970
GUESS WHO HEY HO WHAT YOU DO TO ME 18 9/3/1965
LENNIS-GUESS WORKING FOR MY BABY 29 10/5/1968
GURUS COME GIRL 24 12/9/1966
ARLO GUTHRIE THE MOTORCYCLE SONG (PART 2) 15 2/14/1969
BILL HALEY & THE COMETS THAT’S HOW I GOT TO MEMPHIS 22 4/18/1969
HALF A SIXPENCE MR. ZERO 10 6/10/1966
LEONID HAMBRO & GERSHON KINGSLEY RHAPSODY IN BLUE 22 5/7/1971
BIG JOHN HAMILTON THE TRAIN 31 6/17/1967
GAYLE HANESS JOHNNY ANDER 4 12/16/1966
HAPPENINGS EL PASO COUNTY JAIL 20 11/7/1969
HAPPENINGS RANDY 27 5/28/1968
HARBINGERS TOMPKINS SQUARE 31 2/12/1968
HARDLY-WORTHIT PLAYERS THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 5 6/10/1967
HARDY BOYS LOVE AND LET LOVE 14 12/12/1969
BILLY HARNER SHE’S ALMOST YOU 38 2/28/1969
GEORGE HARRISON DEEP BLUE 4 9/17/1971
JOHN HARTFORD GENTLE ON MY MIND 15 5/27/1967
HASSLES YOU’VE GOT ME HUMMIN’ 27 11/13/1967
HECTOR & THE EASTMEN WOBBLELOU 27 4/29/1967
DONALD HEIGHT YOU BETTER SIT DOWN KIDS 39 12/23/1968
HELLO PEOPLE ANTHEM 34 3/21/1969
HELLO PEOPLE PASS ME BY 38 3/26/1971
JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE FIRE (LP CUT) 14 7/13/1968
JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE THE WIND CRIES MARY 1 8/26/1967
HENDRIX BAND OF GYPSYS STEPPING STONE 37 6/5/1970
LARRY HENLEY ANSWER ME MY LOVE 38 10/5/1968
LARRY HENLEY PEOPLE GET READY 16 4/22/1969
HIGH AND THE MIGHTY ESCAPE FROM CUBA 12 8/26/1966
BILL HJERPE NAVIGATION BLUES 13 4/15/1966
HOGS BLUES THEME 27 12/30/1966
HOLLIES YOU KNOW HE DID 14 8/13/1965
JAKE HOLMES THINK I’M BEING HAD 29 3/25/1967
HONEYCOMBS CAN’T GET THROUGH TO YOU 15 10/8/1965
HOPPI & THE BEAU HEEMS* I MISSED MY CLOUD 25 11/17/1967
HORIZON SHE OPENED UP LIKE A ROSEBUD 38 12/4/1970
HOT CITY* LEAVING 37 2/11/1972
HOT ICE YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE 38 12/10/1971
HARLAN HOWARD SUNDAY MORNING CHRISTIAN 29 4/23/1971
FRED HUGHES BABY BOY 13 1/30/1970
HUMAN BEINZ THIS LITTLE GIRL OF MINE 20 4/22/1969
JOHN HURLEY LAND OF MILK & HONEY 38 12/25/1970
IAN & SYLVIA SOME KIND OF FOOL 39 12/17/1971
ILLUSIONS* I KNOW 3 8/5/1966
INSPIRATIONS TOUCH ME, KISS ME, HOLD ME 8 4/22/1967
INVITATIONS WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME BABY 38 11/12/1965
TERRY JACKS I’M GONNA CAPTURE YOU 34 7/30/1970
JACKSON 5 SANTA CLAUS IS COMING TO TOWN 23 1/7/1971
JACOBSON & TANSLEY DREAM WITH ME 32 10/7/1966
JAGGED EDGE DEEP INSIDE 28 9/2/1966
JAMES GANG GEORGIA PINES 4 1/28/1966
COOK E. JARR RED BALLOON 19 2/28/1969
JAY & THE AMERICANS WHEN IT’S ALL OVER 30 5/28/1965
JAY & THE TECHNIQUES CHANGE YOUR MIND 18 5/23/1969
JAYBEES I’M A LONER 31 8/27/1966
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE HAVE YOU SEEN THE SAUCERS 20 9/25/1970
JOE JEFFREY THE TRAIN 6 11/21/1969
DICK JENSEN & THE IMPORTS UNCLE JOHN’S GOOD TIME BAND 39 3/11/1966
JET STREAM ALL’S QUIET ON WEST 23rd 39 7/9/1967
JOHN PAUL JONES MAN FROM NAZARETH 14 3/26/1971
PAUL JONES FREE ME 31 9/9/1967
PAUL JONES MIGHTY SHIP 10 2/18/1972
THELMA JONES THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 39 4/6/1968
JORGE TIC TAC TOE 39 3/7/1969
JOY STRINGS O LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM 31 12/16/1967
JUST US USED TO BE 39 10/1/1971
JUST US WHAT ARE WE GONNA DO 7 11/11/1967
KASENETZ-KATZ SUPER CIRKUS EMBRASSEZ MOI 17 3/21/1969
KATHY AND LARRY MAGIC ISLAND 27 9/30/1967
KENTUCKY EXPRESS YOU CAN’T ALWAYS & COME AND GET IT 39 4/16/1971
JESSE LEE KINCAID SHE SANG HYMNS OUT OF TUNE 35 1/27/1967
BEN E. KING & DEE DEE SHARP WHAT’CHA GONNA DO ABOUT IT 28 8/10/1968
JONATHAN KING ROUND, ROUND 19 5/27/1967
KING CURTIS WHOLE LOTTA LOVE 38 2/5/1971
KINGSTON TRIO SCOTCH AND SODA 4 5/13/1969
KNACK I’M AWARE 28 3/18/1967
KNACK PRETTY DAISY 35 7/22/1967
KNICKERBOCKERS CHAPEL IN THE FIELDS 27 8/19/1966
KOLLEKTION* SAVAGE LOST 30 11/4/1967
O.B. LAND LITTLE BY LITTLE 16 4/24/1970
HOAGY LANDS WHITE GARDENIA 30 10/26/1968
KENDREW LASCELLES THE BOX 37 9/11/1970
LAST WORD* I WISH I HAD TIME 5 1/27/1968
BENNY LATIMORE* GIRL I GOT NEWS FOR YOU 30 6/3/1967
BENNY LATIMORE* IT’S JUST A MATTER OF TIME 24 12/2/1967
LE CIRQUE LAND OF OZ 33 10/14/1967
BARRY LEE SHOW I DON’T WANT TO LOVE YOU 5 3/25/1968
LEMON PIPERS TURN AROUND AND TAKE A LOOK 28 9/26/1967
LEN AND GLEN ONE, TWO — RED AND BLUE 30 4/29/1966
LEVON AND THE HAWKS THE STONES I THROW 35 12/10/1965
BARBARA LEWIS ONLY ALL THE TIME 24 7/29/1967
GARY LEWIS & THE PLAYBOYS LITTLE MISS GO-GO 34 5/14/1965
JENNIFER LEWIS & ANGELA STRANGE BRING IT TO ME 36 10/1/1965
LEWIS & CLARKE EXPEDITION CHAIN AROUND THE FLOWERS 20 5/25/1968
PEGGY LIPTON LU 33 2/27/1970
LITTLE LISA HANG ON BILL 39 10/1/1965
LITTLE WILLIE & THE ADOLESCENTS* GET OUT OF MY LIFE 9 12/30/1966
LIVERPOOL FIVE CLOUDY 9 5/9/1967
LIVERPOOL FIVE HEART 1 5/6/1966
LIVERPOOL FIVE IF YOU GOTTA GO, GO NOW 40 9/3/1965
LIVERPOOL FIVE NEW DIRECTIONS 16 9/2/1966
LIVERPOOL FIVE SISTER LOVE 21 7/1/1966
LIVERPOOL FIVE THE SNAKE 29 11/4/1966
LIVING LEGENDS MONKEY DON’T CARE 14 5/20/1966
GRADY LLOYD LAY DOWN YOUR ARMS 7 2/3/1967
JACKIE LOMAX THE EAGLE LAUGHS AT YOU 38 11/9/1968
LOVE SCULPTURE SABRE DANCE 37 2/21/1969
LYME AND CYBELLE IF YOU GOTTA GO, GO NOW 1 8/5/1966
JUDY LYNN MARRIED TO A MEMORY 36 5/14/1971
TAMMI LYNN I’M GONNA RUN AWAY FROM YOU 26 9/2/1971
LIV MAESSEN KNOCK KNOCK WHO’S THERE 39 10/2/1970
MAGNA CARTA RING OF STONES 34 2/5/1971
LEE MALLORY THAT’S THE WAY IT’S GONNA BE 15 11/25/1966
MAMA CASS & DAVE MASON SOMETHING TO MAKE YOU HAPPY 31 2/5/1971
MAMAS & THE PAPAS I CALL YOUR NAME (LP CUT) 3 5/27/1966
MANFRED MANN MY NAME IS JACK 29 7/27/1968
ROSALIE MARK EVERY STEP GETS A LITTLE BIT SLOWER 37 6/25/1971
MICHAEL HENRY MARTIN LITTLE TIN GOD 13 3/7/1969
MAX NIX KICKS INN 14 6/17/1966
JOHN MAYALL’S BLUESBREAKERS OH, PRETTY WOMAN 40 12/23/1967
GEORGE McCANNON III BIRDS OF ALL NATIONS 39 4/3/1970
PAUL McCARTNEY MAYBE I’M AMAZED (LP Cut) 21 5/29/1970
ROD McKUEN BABY BE MY LOVE 8 4/8/1967
ROBIN McNAMARA I CAN LOVE YOU 18 3/21/1969
DAVID McWILLIAMS DAYS OF PEARLY SPENCER 38 3/30/1968
MELANIE MY BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 13 1/27/1968
BILL MEDLEY GONE 38 11/6/1970
BILL MEDLEY HELP ME MAKE IT THROUGH THE NIGHT 39 4/14/1972
MERGING TRAFFIC BIT BY BIT 35 6/27/1969
MERLIN COLORADO 29 7/2/1971
TONY MIDDLETON ANGELA 39 8/1/1969
BOB MIRANDA GIRL ON A SWING 23 8/31/1968
MITCHELL/ST. NICKLAUS DON’T GO DADDY 28 11/14/1969
MOB MONEY 23 6/25/1971
MOBY GRAPE CAN’T BE SO BAD 20 7/13/1968
STEPHEN MONAHAN CITY OF WINDOWS 9 7/17/1967
JULIE MONDAY COME SHARE THE GOOD TIMES WITH ME 29 7/16/1966
MONKEES I WANNA BE FREE (LP CUT) 3 12/2/1966
MONKEES SHE/WHEN LOVE COMES KNOCKING (LP) 4 2/10/1967
MONTANAS THAT’S WHEN HAPPINESS BEGAN 5 12/23/1966
HUGO MONTENEGRO GOOD VIBRATIONS 15 2/28/1969
MOONRAKERS BABY PLEASE DON’T GO 29 7/8/1966
KENT MORRILL STILL THE SUN ROSE 38 11/13/1970
JANE MORGAN KISS TOMORROW GOODBYE 33 1/20/1967
RUSSELL MORRIS THE REAL THING 7 8/31/1969
VAN MORRISON RO RO ROSEY 28 11/3/1967
MOTHER EARTH GOOD NIGHT NELDA GREBE 38 12/31/1968
MOTHERS OF INVENTION HOW COULD I BE SUCH A FOOL 37 8/19/1966
MOVE I CAN HEAR THE GRASS GROW 21 8/5/1967
MOVERS* BIRMINGHAM 5 10/5/1968
MUGWUMPS SEARCHIN’ 33 5/14/1967
DEE MULLINS WAR BABY 20 8/5/1967
MICKEY MURRAY HIT RECORD 27 12/16/1967
MUSIC EXPLOSION LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE 36 7/29/1967
BILLY MYSNER LITTLE OL’ ROCK ‘N’ ROLL BAND 24 3/10/1972
MYSTERIES* I CAN’T WAIT FOR LOVE 9 5/18/1968
MYSTERIES* PLEASE AGREE 6 2/3/1968
NATIONAL BANK WITH CHUCK TROIS DEAR MR. FANTASY 39 8/8/1969
WILLIE NELSON HE SITS AT MY TABLE 19 6/17/1966
NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS HEY JUDE – ATLANTIS 24 8/22/1969
NEW YORK ROCK ENSEMBLE BESIDE YOU 37 1/29/1971
MICKEY NEWBURY MOBILE BLUE 33 4/14/1972
NEWPORT NEWS WHEN THE BELL RINGS 10 5/5/1972
NEXT FIVE MAMA SAID 34 3/10/1968
NICE AMERICA & 2nd AMENDMENT 4 1/21/1969
NICE COUNTRY PIE/BRANDENBURG CONCERTO 38 10/16/1970
NIGHTCRAWLERS* A BASKET OF FLOWERS 18 3/25/1966
NIGHTCRAWLERS* I DON’T REMEMBER 19 8/26/1966
NIGHTCRAWLERS* MY BUTTERFLY 30 5/27/1967
NILSSON TEN LITTLE INDIANS 30 9/2/1967
NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND RAVE ON 27 6/5/1970
NOAH’S ARK* I GET ALL THE LUCK 19 8/19/1967
NOAH’S ARK* PAPER MAN 6 12/2/1967
NRBQ* STOMP 30 6/20/1969
OLA & THE JANGLERS CALIFORNIA SUN 24 3/6/1970
OUTRAGE THE LETTER 39 2/7/1969
P.K. LIMITED SHADES OF GRAY 28 4/9/1971
JACK PALANCE HANNAH 40 7/30/1970
BOBBY PARIS PER-SO-NALLY 30 9/28/1968
ANDY PARKS SUNSHINE ON MY SHOULDER 39 1/28/1972
PAZANT BROTHERS SKUNK JUICE 36 10/12/1968
PEANUT BUTTER CONSPIRACY BACK IN L.A. 28 11/7/1969
PEDESTRIANS THINK TWICE 1 6/20/1968
PERREY-KINGSLEY SWAN’S SPLASHDOWN 6 2/3/1967
PETER, PAUL & MARY SOMETIME LOVIN’ 15 10/14/1966
PINKERTON’S ‘ASSORT’ COLOURS MIRROR, MIRROR 16 3/26/1966
GENE PITNEY A STREET CALLED HOPE 26 6/26/1970
PLANT LIFE* FLOWER GIRL 3 9/30/1967
PREMIERS GET ON THIS PLANE 36 2/10/1967
ELVIS PRESLEY MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY 18 1/7/1972
ELVIS PRESLEY WE CAN MAKE THE MORNING 20 3/3/1972
ALAN PRICE SET HI-LILI, HI-LO 20 9/20/1966
ALAN PRICE SET THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 15 10/2/1967
ALAN PRICE SET SIMON SMITH & AMAZING DANCING BEAR 16 5/9/1967
P.J. PROBY MISSION BELL 17 5/14/1965
PROCOL HARUM IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS OF SIXPENCE 14 5/27/1968
PROCTOR AMUSEMENT COMPANY* HEARD YOU WENT AWAY 15 7/29/1967
PUSSYCATS I WANT YOUR LOVE 5 5/28/1965
QUICK BROWN FOX COME ON DOWN TO NEW ORLEANS 18 6/27/1969
RAIDERS IT’S SO HARD GETTIN’ UP TODAY 29 2/18/1972
RAINBOW OPEN UP YOUR HEART 9 5/19/1972
EDDIE RAMBEAU I’M THE SKY 39 4/8/1966
RASCALS ALMOST HOME 39 5/7/1971
RASMUSSEN LOVE SONG 39 9/17/1971
RATIONALS LEAVIN’ HERE 12 7/29/1967
REPARATA AND THE DELRONS I CAN TELL 24 1/8/1966
REPARATA AND THE DELRONS I’M NOBODY’S BABY NOW 32 7/1/1966
REPARATA AND THE DELRONS CAPTAIN OF YOUR SHIP 31 2/3/1968
PAUL REVERE & THE RAIDERS LEGEND OF PAUL REVERE 8 5/27/1967
PAUL REVERE & THE RAIDERS UNDECIDED MAN 8 1/6/1967
CHARLIE RICH I CAN’T GO ON 4 1/15/1966
CHARLIE RICH LIFE’S LITTLE UPS AND DOWNS 19 2/20/1970
CHARLIE RICH NO HOME 28 6/24/1966
RICK, ROBIN & HIM THREE CHORUSES OF DESPAIR 18 7/30/1966
ROAD SHE’S NOT THERE 23 2/7/1969
ROCKIN’ RAMRODS DON’T FOOL WITH FU MANCHU 23 11/19/1965
ROCKIN’ ROADRUNNERS* GO AWAY 20 7/15/1966
ROCKIN’ ROADRUNNERS* KING OF THE JUNGLE/AIN’T GONNA CRY 18 11/4/1966
ROCKIN’ ROADRUNNERS* URBAN MEADOWS 30 4/27/1968
TOMMY ROE FIREFLY 18 4/17/1970
RON-DELS MATILDA 22 3/6/1970
RONNY & THE DAYTONAS BEACH BOY 40 5/28/1965
RONNY & THE DAYTONAS BRAVE NEW WORLD 33 8/12/1967
RONNY & THE DAYTONAS YOUNG 18 1/6/1967
ROOSTERS LOVE MACHINE 10 4/6/1968
BIFF ROSE WHAT’S GNAWING AT ME 23 11/9/1968
TIM ROSE COME AWAY MELINDA 32 1/13/1968
TIM ROSE HEY JOE (YOU SHOT YOUR WOMAN DOWN) 1 11/25/1966
TIM ROSE I’VE GOTTA GET A MESSAGE TO YOU 38 1/1/1971
TIM ROSE LONG HAIRED BOY 25 9/14/1968
TIM ROSE MORNING DEW 23 3/21/1967
TIM ROSE ROANOKE 36 6/20/1969
ROTARY CONNECTION THE WEIGHT 28 6/13/1969
ROTATION RA-TA-TA 36 9/10/1971
BILLY JOE ROYAL YOU MAKE ME FEEL LIKE A MAN 22 1/8/1966
RUBIN YOU’VE BEEN AWAY 27 12/2/1967
RUGBYS WENDEGAHL THE WARLOCK 21 12/19/1969
RUPERT’S PEOPLE REFLECTIONS OF CHALRES BROWN 14 11/4/1967
TOM RUSH WHO DO YOU LOVE 29 3/26/1971
BOBBY RUSSELL FRIENDS AND MIRRORS 28 5/13/1966
SAGITTARIUS ANOTHER TIME 21 2/24/1968
ST. GEORGE & TANA SO TENDERLY 22 7/22/1967
SALT WATER TAFFY FINDERS KEEPERS 22 5/25/1968
SAN SEBASTIAN STRINGS THE MUD KIDS 13 11/11/1967
SAROFEEN & SMOKE SUSAN JANE 37 6/11/1971
SATURDAY MORNING CARTOON SHOW HAYRIDE 18 1/28/1969
SAVOY BROWN A HARD WAY TO GO 23 4/17/1970
SAVOY BROWN SHAKE ‘EM ON DOWN 39 11/16/1968
SCAFFOLD LILY THE PINK 33 1/14/1969
BERNIE SCHWARTZ BABY BYE-O 35 9/3/1965
FREDDY SCOTT* POW CITY 30 8/26/1966
SEEKERS THE CARNIVAL IS OVER 32 11/26/1965
BOB SEGER & THE LAST HEARD HEAVY MUSIC 4 9/16/1967
BOB SEGER & THE LAST HEARD VAGRANT WINTER 39 5/20/1967
BOB SEGER SYSTEM 2 + 2 = ? 1 5/18/1968
SHANGRI-LAS TRAIN FROM KANSAS CITY 31 10/1/1965
SANDIE SHAW HOW CAN YOU TELL 35 2/11/1966
CHARITY SHAYNE AIN’T IT BABE 27 11/19/1965
HANK SHIFTER MARY ON THE BEACH 6 6/22/1968
SHOCKING BLUE NEVER MARRY A RAILROAD MAN 33 10/16/1970
TROY SHONDELL LET’S GO ALL THE WAY 19 1/28/1969
SHUFFLES CHA-LA-LA, I NEED YOU 19 6/26/1970
CHRIS SIMMONS SORAYA 19 2/28/1970
SIMTEC SIMMONS TEA BOX 38 5/20/1967
PAUL SIMON PARANOIA BLUES 26 3/17/1972
SIMON AND GARFUNKEL 7 O’CLOCK NEWS SILENT NIGHT 16 12/30/1966
SIR RALEIGH & THE CUPONS (sic) TOMORROW’S GONNA BE ANOTHER DAY 36 5/28/1965
SKIN I KEPT ON LOVING YOU 38 11/5/1971
SLADE COZ I LOVE YOU 34 1/7/1972
GRACE SLICK & GREAT SOCIETY SALLY GO ROUND THE ROSES 23 12/6/1969
SMOKE RINGS LOVE’S THE THING 17 12/24/1966
SONICS PSYCHO 1 4/22/1967
SONICS THE WITCH 26 12/17/1966
SONS OF CHAMPLIN SING ME A RAINBOW 32 5/14/1967
SOUNDS, INCORPORATED HALL OF THE MOUNTAIN KING 17 5/28/1965
SOUNDS OF SUNSHINE I DO ALL MY CRYING IN THE RAIN 25 10/15/1971
JOE SOUTH LEANIN’ ON YOU 18 5/27/1969
OTIS SPANN I GOT MY MOJO WORKING 39 12/12/1969
SPIRAL STARECASE BABY WHAT I MEAN 25 3/9/1968
SPIRIT DARK EYED WOMAN 27 11/14/1969
SPIRIT MECHANICAL WORLD 15 7/6/1968
STANDELLS RIOT ON SUNSET STRIP 12 3/11/1967
STANDELLS TRY IT 1 6/3/1967
STEINWAYS* MY HEART’S NOT IN IT ANYMORE 19 6/24/1966
MIKE STEIPHENSON RAINBOW 17 4/21/1972
CAT STEVENS MATTHEW AND SON 33 3/3/1967
RAY STEVENS MR. BAKER, THE UNDERTAKER 38 5/28/1965
JOHN STEWART THE LADY AND THE OUTLAW 21 2/6/1970
ROD STEWART MANDOLIN WIND 22 12/17/1971
GARY STITES* HURTING 32 10/14/1966
STUTZ BEARCAT LUCKY LINDY 33 12/30/1966
SWEET ALL YOU’LL EVER GET FROM ME 36 9/25/1970
SWEET INSPIRATIONS THAT’S HOW STRONG MY LOVE IS 25 9/16/1967
SWINGING MEDALLIONS TURN ON THE MUSIC 20 9/9/1967
JERRY TAWNEY SOFT SPOKEN GIRL 38 3/24/1972
TEDDY AND THE PANDAS WE CAN’T GO ON THIS WAY 8 11/11/1966
TEMPESTS LONG LIVE OUR LOVE 26 8/17/1968
NINO TEMPO & APRIL STEVENS I LOVE HOW YOU LOVE ME 32 11/5/1965
TEN YEARS AFTER HEAR ME CALLING 27 1/7/1969
TENNESSEE GUITARS THIRD MAN THEME 38 4/8/1967
JOE TEX IT AIN’T SANITARY 24 10/17/1969
THEM GONNA DRESS IN BLACK 16 9/3/1965
3rd EVOLUTION DON’T PLAY WITH ME 14 11/4/1966
THIRD RAIL BOPPA DO DOWN DOWN 34 11/11/1967
THIRD RAIL SHE AIN’T NO CHOIR GIRL 23 7/20/1968
31st OF FEBRUARY* SANDCASTLES 20 6/8/1968
JOHNNY THOMPSON QUINTET PROMISE HER ANYTHING 35 2/10/1967
THOR’S HAMMER SHOW ME YOU LIKE ME 39 12/9/1967
THORNDIKE PICKLEDISH CHOIR BALLAD OF WALTER WART 16 3/11/1967
THREE DIMENSIONS LOOK AT ME 31 1/1/1966
THREE RING CIRCUS GROOVIN’ ON THE SUNSHINE 27 7/27/1968
THUNDERBIRDS BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE 30 6/24/1966
THUNDERCLAP NEWMAN ACCIDENTS 39 7/17/1970
TIFFANY SYSTEM* LET’S GET TOGETHER 32 8/19/1967
JOHNNY TILLOTSON* DON’T TELL ME IT’S RAINING 36 6/17/1967
JOHNNY TILLOTSON* I DON’T BELIEVE IN IF ANYMORE 29 9/11/1970
JOHNNY TILLOTSON* ONE’S YOURS, ONE’S MINE 26 5/14/1965
TOOMORROW YOU’RE MY BABY 23 8/21/1970
TRAVEL AGENCY WHAT’S A MAN 7 7/11/1969
TROGGS ANY WAY THAT YOU WANT ME 4 5/20/1967
TROGGS NIGHT OF THE LONG GRASS 24 8/5/1967
TROGGS YOU CAN CRY IF YOU WANT TO 18 7/22/1968
TROPICS* THIS MUST BE THE PLACE 15 8/26/1967
TROPICS* TIME 3 2/10/1967
TROPICS* TIRED OF WAITING 14 3/7/1969
WILLIAM TRUCKAWAY BLUEGREENS ON THE WING 5 12/5/1969
GIL TRYTHALL & HIS YAKETY MOOG FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREAKDOWN 31 3/27/1970
JUSTIN TUBB BUT WAIT THERE’S MORE 28 3/3/1967
TURNAROUNDS & STINGERS SALT ‘N’ PEPPER 25 5/28/1965
UNCHAINED MYNDS WE CAN’T GO ON THIS WAY 1 7/18/1969
UNDERTAKERS* LOVE SO DEAR 27 11/11/1967
UNDERTAKERS* SEARCHING 15 5/6/1967
UZI MORNING TRAIN 18 9/11/1970
JIM VALLEY THERE IS LOVE 9 7/15/1967
ALAN VALLONE A LITTLE BIT OF THIS & LITTLE BIT OF THAT 39 8/17/1968
LEROY VAN DYKE YOU COULDN’T GET MY LOVE BACK 25 5/6/1966
VANILLA FUDGE SOME VELVET MORNING 14 6/6/1969
BOBBY VEE IN AND OUT OF LOVE 36 3/6/1970
VIBRATIONS SMOKE SIGNALS 13 3/20/1970
WAILERS IT’S YOU ALONE 22 6/18/1966
SUZY WALLIS BE MY MAN 40 12/24/1965
DALE WARD YOUR SEVENTEENTH YEAR 13 7/29/1967
WE THE PEOPLE* AIN’T GONNA FIND NOBODY 17 5/4/1968
WE THE PEOPLE* FOLLOW ME BACK TO LOUISVILLE 19 9/23/1967
WE THE PEOPLE* HE DOESN’T GO ABOUT IT/YOU BURN ME 8 10/14/1966
WE THE PEOPLE* MIRROR OF YOUR MIND 7 7/29/1966
WE THE PEOPLE* MY BROTHER THE MAN 23 4/8/1966
WE THE PEOPLE* ST. JOHN’S SHOP 3 1/13/1967
WE THE PEOPLE* THE DAY SHE DIES 2 1/20/1968
LENNY WELCH DARLING STAY WITH ME 23 2/19/1968
IAN WHITCOMB WHERE DID ROBINSON CRUSOE GO 27 12/9/1966
IAN WHITCOMB SALLY SAILS THE SKY 27 2/3/1968
SLIM WHITMAN IT’S A SIN TO TELL A LIE 39 9/2/1971
DAVID WILKINS JUST BLOW IN HIS EAR 21 3/14/1969
JOHN WILKINSON JULY, YOU’RE A WOMAN 34 4/1/1969
DANNY WILLIAMS MASQUERADE 28 5/14/1965
TEX WILLIAMS NIGHT MISS NANCY ANN’S HOTEL BURNED 15 11/5/1971
WIND I’LL HOLD OUT MY HAND 20 1/9/1970
EDGAR WINTER’S WHITE TRASH WHERE WOULD I BE (WITHOUT YOU) 28 6/25/1971
JOHNNY WINTER I’M YOURS I’M HERS 15 7/11/1969
JOHNNY WINTER ROLLIN’ & TUMBLIN’ 32 5/13/1969
JOHN DEXTER WORTHINGTON* TOYS AND TRAINS 6 4/21/1972
BETTY WRIGHT* SOLDIER BOY 34 2/20/1970
GARY WRIGHT STAND FOR OUR RIGHTS 37 7/2/1971
SANDY WYNNS LOVE BELONGS TO EVERYONE 22 5/14/1965
YANKEE DOLLAR CITY SIDEWALKS 39 8/3/1968
YARDBIRDS GOODNIGHT SWEET JOSEPHINE 19 5/25/1968
YARDBIRDS STILL I’M SAD 9 12/3/1965
YELLOW BALLOON STAINED GLASS WINDOW 27 10/2/1967
YOUNG RASCALS IT’S LOVE 1 7/22/1967
YOUNG RASCALS LOVE IS A BEAUTIFUL THING 8 2/3/1967
TIMI YURO BIG MISTAKE 36 10/8/1965
TIMI YURO CAN’T STOP RUNNING AWAY 26 5/28/1965
ZOMBIES WHENEVER YOU’RE READY 29 9/3/1965

 

WLOF Go Magazines, each containing WLOF's weekly music survey

WLOF Go Magazines, each containing WLOF’s weekly music survey

Before I go any further, I wanted to mention that the station’s surveys from March 1967 through August 1969 were printed in Go Magazine.   The folks at Go would occasionally take it upon themselves to “correct” something they thought was wrong.   A case in point:  “The Ballad of Bonnie & Clyde”.  Bill Vermillion was told that Georgie Fame’s version was not going to be released as a single in the USA, so he decided to program a version on Buddah Records by Chicago Prohibition – 1931.   After that version became a hit on the station, Epic Records went ahead and released Georgie Fame’s rendition, which quickly became the national hit.   Go Magazine, believing that a mistake was made, would change Vermillion’s listing of Chicago Prohibition to a listing for Georgie Fame.   There was also a screw-up involving “Long Hair Soulful” by Bhagavad-Gita, and probably more that I’m not aware of.  WFUN in Miami also ran into some issues with Go, but that’s another story.

This was the version of the Georgie Fame smash that WLOF played

This was the version of the Georgie Fame smash that WLOF played.  Note the “B” rotation sticker on the label, and the changing chart positions written next to the giant B.

 

I also wanted to mention a few more songs that charted in 1964 and 1965.   I don’t have enough surveys from those years to determine the exact dates that they charted, but we know from rotation stickers on the 45s that they reached the positions that are listed.

 

ADORABLES SCHOOL’S ALL OVER 21
VICKIE BAINES GOT TO RUN 37
LEN BARRY LET’S DO IT AGAIN 25
FREDDY CANNON IN THE NIGHT 23
LENNY COLEMAN FOUR SEASONS 21
FOURMOST HELLO LITTLE GIRL 21
BILLY FURY GO AHEAD AND ASK HER 39
ROLF HARRIS RINGO FOR PRESIDENT 19
BARBARA LYNN DEDICATE THE BLUES TO ME 26
CHRIS MONTEZ MONKEY FEVER 34
P.J. PROBY TOGETHER 23
RAG DOLLS BABY’S GONE 34
TRADE WINDS SUMMERTIME GIRL 38
X-CELLENTS HEY, LITTLE WILLIE 33

 

In the next installment, I am going to break down the 13 or 14 non-charters that made it all the way to number one on WLOF… and will look at four additional records that peaked at number two.   Who knows, I might even decide to extend it through the number 3’s, 4’s, and 5’s as well.

If you enjoyed this list, please leave a comment… and be sure to check out the other posts on the Savage Lost blog.

Also see:
WLOF #1 Hits That Missed The Billboard Hot 100

Where Did WLOF Get Its Records?

WLOF & Bill Vermillion:  Florida Top 40 Legends

Jun 11

WLOF #1 Hits That Missed The Billboard Hot 100

WLOF_060167B

 

Here are more than a dozen records that not only were played on WLOF, and not only were hits on the station, but made it all the way to NUMBER ONE… despite completely missing the Billboard Magazine Hot 100.   I’ve listed them in chronological order.   An asterisk denotes a Florida-based artist (though not necessarily Central Florida.)  You can click on the images to view them full size.

 

The Liverpool Five enjoyed huge success on WLOF

Liverpool Five enjoyed huge success on WLOF

 

LIVERPOOL FIVE – HEART (5/6/66)

WLOF played no less than six different records by this London band that had relocated to Burbank, California.   “Heart” was co-written by British superstar Petula Clark, and was also recorded by artists ranging from the Remains to the 2 Of Clubs.

 

 

This was WLOF's copy of the Clee Shays record, rotation markings and all.  Notice the sticker that denotes that it was the station's #74 hit for the year 1966.

This was WLOF’s copy of the Clee Shays record, rotation markings and all. Notice the sticker that denotes that it was the station’s 74th biggest hit in1966.

 

 

THE CLEE-SHAYS – THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. (5/20/66)

Bill Vermillion had a hunch that this TV theme would break big, and it did in Orlando — just not anywhere else.   The group included members of the Challengers, from California.

 

 

 

A Bob Dylan composition that was top ten all throughout Florida, including a spot at the top on WLOF Channel 95.

A Bob Dylan composition that was top ten all throughout Florida, including the top spot on WLOF Channel 95.

 

 

LYME & CYBELLE – IF YOU GOTTA GO, GO NOW (8/5/66)

“Follow Me” made the Billboard charts, but the duo’s second release (featuring a young Warren Zevon) didn’t match the success of its predecessor — even though it managed to make the top ten on both WFUN and WQAM in Miami.   The song had previously charted in Florida by Manfred Mann and the aforementioned Liverpool Five.

 

Hey Joe, where are you going with that record in your hand?  This was WLOF's rotation copy until it reached #2 (see sticker) and was replaced by a fresher copy.

Hey Joe, where are you going with that record in your hand? This was WLOF’s rotation copy until it reached #2 (see sticker) when it was replaced by a fresher copy.

 

 

TIM ROSE – HEY JOE (YOU SHOT YOUR WOMAN DOWN) (11/25/66)

Tim Rose was a major star in WLOF-land, scoring six top 40 hits over a 4 1/2 year period.   Rose’s slowed-down version of “Hey Joe” would influence Jimi Hendrix and many cover bands in the Orlando area.

 

 

This Northwest garage band classic was way too wild for most Top 40 stations... but not WLOF.

This Northwest garage band classic was way too wild for most Top 40 stations… but not WLOF.

 

 

THE SONICS – PSYCHO (4/22/67)

Bill Vermillion saw parallels between the Orlando and Seattle markets, and would occasionally jump on songs that were happening in the Pacific Northwest.   This garage punk classic is at the top of the list.

 

 

 

WLOF didn't wait until the midnight hour to play this regional #1 song.  Another one-time Channel 95 rotation copy...

WLOF didn’t wait until the midnight hour to play this regional #1 song. Another one-time Channel 95 rotation copy…

 

 

THE BERRYS – MIDNIGHT HOUR (5/25/67)

Several artists competed for supremacy in the “Midnight Hour” sweepstakes, but in Orlando, it was the Berrys that broke free of the pack.  The band came from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

 

 

Bill Vermillion loved the Standells, and why not?   This  was also a smash hit on WQAM and WFUN in Miami.

Bill Vermillion loved the Standells, and why not? This was also a smash hit on WQAM and WFUN in Miami.

 

 

THE STANDELLS – TRY IT (6/1/67)

Bill Vermillion thought this cool garage raver would duplicate the success of “Dirty Water”.   It didn’t, but it did become a major hit in many parts of the Sunshine State.

 

 

This B-side thought it was an A-side... and so did many of Channel 95's listeners.

This B-side thought it was an A-side… and so did many of Channel 95’s listeners.

 

 

THE YOUNG RASCALS – IT’S LOVE (7/22/67)

Yes, it was the B-side of “A Girl Like You”, but as Vermillion noted on July 3, 1967, “we started on the plug side, then started playing both sides.  A check with stores indicates that most buyers are requesting the B-side.  This is also being borne out by requests at the station.”

WLOF is believed to be the first top 40 station in America on which Jimi Hendrix reached #1.

WLOF is believed to be the first top 40 station in America on which Jimi Hendrix reached #1.

 

 

THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE – THE WIND CRIES MARY (8/26/67)

A giant hit in Orlando that knocked “My Mammy” by the Happenings out of the #1 spot.   Yes, Top 40 was all about variety in those days.

 

Bill Vermillion used to rave about Bob Seger, back when very few outside of Michigan had heard of him.

Bill Vermillion used to rave about Bob Seger, back when very few outside of Michigan had heard of him.

 

 

BOB SEGER SYSTEM – 2+2=? (5/18/68)

This was the third, and by far the biggest early Seger hit on WLOF.   Vermillion really believed in Seger’s talent, and that faith was later rewarded.

 

 

It took a while for this moody ballad to catch on, but once it did it went all the way to the top.

It took a while for this moody ballad to catch on, but once it did it went all the way to the top.

 

THE PEDESTRIANS – THINK TWICE (6/20/68)

Here’s what Vermillion wrote to WAPE’s Ike Lee and WUWU’s Bob Dennis back on May 13, 1968:  “Another record you should get on is ‘Think Twice’ by the Pedestrians.  It takes about 2 to 3 weeks to break.   If you hear it and don’t like it, listen again.  It was number one for the year in Grand Rapids, #2 for the year in Fort Wayne, and headed up the charts in Orlando now.”  Just over a month later, it hit number one, and was eventually named WLOF’s number 10 song for the year.

Bee Gees influenced pop by a band that was also known as The British Casuals

Bee Gees influenced pop by a band that was also known as The British Casuals

 

THE CASUALS – JESAMINE (A BUTTERFLY CHILD) (12/2/68)

A British hit that zoomed up the local charts, eventually being named WLOF’s #4 single for the year 1968 (behind only “Hey Jude”, “Love Is Blue”, and “The Horse”).   Paul Weller of the Jam has listed “Jesamine” as one of his favorite songs.

 

"We Can't Go On This Way" was a two-time top ten hit in Orlando, including this one at number one.

“We Can’t Go On This Way” was a two-time top ten hit in Orlando, including this version at number one.

 

THE UNCHAINED MYNDS – WE CAN’T GO ON THIS WAY (7/18/69)

This Wisconsin band bubbled under the Billboard Hot 100, but couldn’t quite break through to the main chart.   This was the second time this song reached the WLOF top ten — it hit #8 for Massachusetts’ Teddy & the Pandas during the week of November 11, 1966.

 

beatlesrubbersoul

 

HONORABLE MENTION:
THE BEATLES – RUBBER SOUL ALBUM (12/24/65)

Yes, it hit number one for two weeks, but it shared the billing with the group’s current single, “We Can Work It Out”/”Day Tripper”.  Would the album have made it to the top of the singles chart without that double-sided smash?   We may never know.  “Girl” and “Michelle” were the most played tracks off the album.

 

Those are the number ones.   Now here are four number two’s that completely missed the Billboard Hot 100.

 

The Beatles didn't need any "help" in conquering the WLOF Channel 95 charts.

The Beatles didn’t need any “help” in conquering the WLOF Channel 95 charts.

THE BEATLES – YOU’RE GONNA LOSE THAT GIRL (LP CUT) (10/8/65)

This Beatles album track got huge requests, enough to drive it to the runner-up spot behind “Run Baby Run” by the Newbeats.  Two Florida bands, the Villagers and the Pagans, covered the tune and had regional hits, but neither could compare to the original recording off the Beatles’ Help! soundtrack.

 

astronautsla

 

THE ASTRONAUTS – THE LA LA LA SONG (10/15/65)

An unexpected local smash hit by a Colorado band, with a song whose co-writers included Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart.

 

The highest-charting song by an Orlando band that hit the WLOF charts with every release.

The highest-charting song by an Orlando band that hit the WLOF charts with every release.

 

 

WE THE PEOPLE… – THE DAY SHE DIES (1/20/68)

We The People had no less than seven local hit records, and this gorgeous, moody Tommy Talton composition was the biggest of them all.  It’s hard to believe that the song that kept this out of the top spot was Harper’s Bizarre’s remake of “Chattanooga Choo Choo”!

One-time WLOF rotation copy of this local #2 smash.  Notice the "B" rotation sticker from its climb up the charts.

One-time WLOF rotation copy of this local #2 smash. Notice the “B” rotation sticker from its climb up the charts.

 

 

 

FLASH & THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS – I PRAY FOR RAIN (2/12/68)

The first of two Central Florida hits by a Memphis band that was produced by co-writer Dan Penn.  Their follow-up, “Busy Signal”, only reached number 30.

 

 

 

 

While I’m at it, I might as well break down the songs that peaked at numbers 3, 4, and  5.   With the exception of the album cuts, all of these were huge regional hits that barely had a pulse on America’s top 40 stations upon their release.

 

#3 peak on WLOF

MAMAS & THE PAPAS – I CALL YOUR NAME (LP CUT) (5/27/66)

ILLUSIONS* – I KNOW (8/5/66)

MONKEES – I WANNA BE FREE (LP CUT) (12/2/66)

WE THE PEOPLE* – ST. JOHN’S SHOP (1/13/67)

TROPICS* – TIME (2/10/67)

BRAM RIGG SET – I CAN ONLY GIVE YOU EVERYTHING (5/9/67)

CREAM – STRANGE BREW (9/23/67)

PLANT LIFE* – FLOWER GIRL (9/30/67)

COUNT FIVE – MAILMAN (7/18/69)

—————————————————————-

#4 peak on WLOF

CHARLIE RICH – I CAN’T GO ON (1/15/66)

JAMES GANG – GEORGIA PINES (1/28/66)

WAYNE COCHRAN* – GET DOWN WITH IT (6/3/66)

GAYLE HANESS – JOHNNY ANDER (12/16/66)

MONKEES – SHE/WHEN LOVE COMES KNOCKING (LP CUTS) (2/10/67)

TROGGS – ANY WAY THAT YOU WANT ME (5/20/67)

BOB SEGER & THE LAST HEARD – HEAVY MUSIC (9/16/67)

THE NICE – AMERICA & 2nd AMENDMENT (1/21/69)

KINGSTON TRIO – SCOTCH AND SODA (live version) (5/13/69)

GEORGE HARRISON – DEEP BLUE (9/17/71)

————————————————————-

#5 peak on WLOF

LORNE GREENE – SAND (5/14/65)

PUSSYCATS – I WANT YOUR LOVE (5/28/65)

BIRDWATCHERS* – I’M GONNA LOVE YOU ANYWAY (9/16/66)

MONTANAS – THAT’S WHEN HAPPINESS BEGAN (12/23/66)

COUNT FIVE – YOU MUST BELIEVE ME (4/22/67)

HARDLY-WORTHIT PLAYERS – THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD (6/10/67)

LAST WORD* – I WISH I HAD TIME (1/27/68)

BARRY LEE SHOW – I DON’T WANT TO LOVE YOU (3/25/68)

MOVERS* – BIRMINGHAM (10/5/68)

DICK DODD – LITTLE SISTER (12/2/68)

WILLIAM TRUCKAWAY – BLUEGREENS ON THE WING (12/5/69)

 

Keep reading for a look at where WLOF got the many 45s that it played… and check out the dozens of other posts on the SAVAGE LOST blog.

May 26

Where Did WLOF Get Its Records?

Bill Vermillion's desk in 1969.   There's a reason it was so messy...

Bill Vermillion’s desk in 1969. There’s a reason it was so messy…

 

In order for Bill Vermillion to use his magic music director ears, somebody had to provide a steady stream of records to the station.  In a perfect world, each record company would have the means to provide every radio station with product — but in the ’60s, just like today, it was not a perfect world.  Take, for example, Motown, which sometimes provided spotty service.  Even though WLOF charted Motown obscurities such as “Hang On Bill” by Little Lisa (#39 on October 1, 1965) and “Three Choruses Of Despair” by Rick, Robin & Him (#18 on July 30, 1966), the label still missed sending some key releases — including their biggest hit of entire decade, “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” by Marvin Gaye, which would up peaking at a disappointing number three on WLOF’s chart for the week ending January 21, 1969.   (It was #1 on Billboard Magazine’s Hot 100 for 7 weeks.)

Picking up the slack were two Miami powerhouses — Campus Record Distributing, and Henry Stone’s Tone Distributors.  If Bill Vermillion was still here, I’m sure he’d give a shout out to Eddie Lambert and Brian Baker at Campus, and Bobby Puccetti (leader of Miami’s Birdwatchers band) and Milt Oshins at Tone.  Here’s what Vermillion wrote in February 1968:

“Miami appears to be turning into a two distributor town.  Both Campus and Tone are getting bigger with every passing week.  Except for the factory branches, it’s getting to the point where I can (get) 80% of all records (based on this week’s playlist) from two distributors.  And on top of that, as they get bigger, my service actually seems to improve from them both.  Maybe that’s why they are getting bigger.  Tone just picked up the MGM line from what I’ve heard so maybe things will get better along that line.”

Vermillion discovered that Tone accounted for about 42% of the February 12, 1968 playlist.   Campus came in at 33%.  Two other independent distributors accounted for around 10%, with 15% coming from factory branches.

In November of that month, Vermillion counted more than 1,200 singles and 179 albums coming in to the station.  Here’s how the 45s broke down:

Direct Mail      611
Tone                340
Campus         241
Music Sales     15

That’s a lot of 45s, and Vermillion listened to each and every one.  And did an air shift.  And served as an engineer.  And spoke to dozens of promo and radio guys (and record stores) each week.  And tried to have some kind of family life.  (I’m getting tired just thinking about it!)   No, Vermillion wasn’t the only reason WLOF’s legend continues to grow — but his dedication is reason number one.  Perhaps there were better-sounding stations out there, but WLOF — like its music director — was the whole package.   And speaking of packages, dig these:

 

Bobby Birdwatcher and Tone Distributors kept WLOF well-stocked on many new releases.

Bobby Birdwatcher and Tone Distributors kept WLOF well-stocked on many new releases.

 

Miami's Campus Distributors also provided a good amount of records to Florida radio stations.

Miami’s Campus Distributors also provided a good amount of records to Florida radio stations.

Music Sales of Florida also provided records to play, although not on the scale of Tone and Campus.

Music Sales of Florida also provided records to play, although not on the scale of Tone and Campus.

 

 

And just for fun, here are a few direct mail boxes that were sent to Vermillion and WLOF radio.

 

 

Jewel-Paula Records of Shreveport, Louisiana

Jewel-Paula Records of Shreveport, Louisiana

Shelby Singleton in Nashville provided copies of records on the SSS, Minaret, and Plantation labels.

Shelby Singleton in Nashville provided copies of records on the SSS, Minaret, and Plantation labels.

 

Here's a small package from Laurie Records in New York.

Here’s a small package from Laurie Records in New York.

 

Now that you’re here, check out the OTHER POSTS on the Savage Lost blog, including Remembering Henry Stone and his Tone Distributors.

Remembering Henry Stone(Click here to read)

 

Sep 26

The Real Teen Tragedies Behind Two Moody Garage 45s

An early shot of the Emotions, from St. Petersburg

An early shot of the Emotions, from St. Petersburg. Click image to view it full screen.

 

WHY MUST IT BE?

Tragedy brings people together.    The worst of times can bring out the best in us, and nowhere is that more evident than in a local music scene, or among amateur athletes.  Twice, in the years 1967 and 1968, the deaths of Tampa-area high school athletes brought not only their teams together, but the local music community as well.

emotionswhy

 

The story starts with a record by a St. Petersburg group known as the Emotions.  The fivesome chose a Zombies song (“Sometimes”) for the A-side, but it’s my opinion (and that of other garage band fanatics) that the B-side was the real gem.   The label says “Why Must It Be” was co-written by someone named “Ruckert”, but it wasn’t group leader and guitarist Toby Ruckert.   It was his brother Stuart who composed the introspective lyrics that were turned into a gem of a moody garage ballad.

“This life on earth is hard to bear,
Living with people who just don’t care.
Even though I exist today,
If I was to die now, what would they say?”

 

charliebeauchamp

 

Those lyrics took on an eerie tone just a few months later, after vocalist Charlie Beauchamp joined the band (replacing original singer Mark Bass).   Beauchamp, a Boca Ciega High School student, wasn’t just interested in music.   He was also a three-year varsity halfback, and one of the top second basemen in Pinellas County.

One Friday afternoon in April 1967, Beauchamp was manning second base, when he collided with another player and landed on his head.  He underwent a tracheotomy and brain surgery, but a few days later his kidneys failed and Charlie’s life ended.   On the day of the accident, Charlie learned he had received an academic scholarship from Mercer University.   He was just 17 years old.

“Even though I exist today,
If I was to die now, what would they say?
A drop of water I’m meant to be,
Lost in the sea of humanity.
Why must it be?  Why must it be?”

 

Heavy lyrics, that all of a sudden hit a little close to home.

 

Click image to view it full size

Click image to view it full size

 

The Emotions continued, with Toby Ruckert remaining the constant member of the band.    The group opened for the likes of the Turtles, Left Banke, Dave Clark Five, and Peter and Gordon, and remained popular on the local circuit.   Ruckert would go on to join the well-regarded band Duckbutter, before hooking up with country star Mark Wills (among others).  Beauchamp wasn’t forgotten.    It took more than thirty years, but the football field at Boca Ciega was renamed in his memory, keeping his name alive for future generations.

beauchampstadium

No credits and little information, but oh what a story to tell

No credits and little information, but oh what a story to tell

 

 

MY FRIEND

 

A year later. Clearwater High would also mourn the loss of a 17-year-old football star.  Unlike Beauchamp’s freak accident, Frank Andrew Russell had been ill, and his death, while tragic, wasn’t completely unexpected.  After the popular student passed, a memorial scholarship was set up in Russell’s name, and Clearwater student Michael Dan Ehmig — with some help from fellow high school vocalist Joe Spiewak — set out to tell his story in song.

What the pair created was nothing short of brilliant, but not in the way you’d expect.   You might think they’d set about to write words of comfort and solace, not a narration of his funeral!   There is no other record in the world quite like “My Friend”.   It defines the words “moody garage” in just about every way, but it’s the lyrics that really make this the amazing piece of vinyl that it is.

“I see pretty flowers, his favorite, I hear.
I see a grey coffin which no one goes near.
I see many people, his friends from his life,
But I can’t see my friend, he’s nowhere in sight.”

Grab the tissues!   But oh, we’re just beginning.

“Our friend is gone now, he’ll never return!”
“I wish it had been me that died instead of he!”

Oh, I’m feeling so much better.   Not!!

I’m not out to criticize songwriter Ehmig.    I think the record he created is a work of genius.   It’s rarely too far from my turntable.   It’s just that this must have been so painful to endure for some who knew and loved Russell.   The record was about as DIY as can be:  one-sided (no flip side), with no artist or writer credits.   In spreading the word about this to my fellow record collectors (and the TeenBeat Mayhem! book), we had to simply refer to the artist as Clearwater High School Class of ’68.  There were very few clues to go on.   Thanks to Joe Spiewak, we now know that the backing band was the U.S. Male (aka the Uglies), who also recorded for United American Productions.   The band does a good job.   Everyone does.  They created a piece of work that still has an impact on the few that are fortunate to have heard it.

 

 

The U.S. Male, formerly known as the Uglies

The U.S. Male, formerly known as the Uglies, provided the musical backing. The group had ties to the Impacs, Members, Roemans, and 70s hit artist Lobo. Click the image to view it full screen.

 

Michael Dan Ehmig would go on to write and arrange for Lita Ford and Meat Loaf, and his songs have been recorded by the likes of Melanie, Joe Cocker, and Katrina & the Waves.   “My Friend” is probably just a blip on his songwriting radar, but in its own way, it will endure… and so will the memory of Frank Andrew Russell.   And isn’t that what it was all about, in the first place?

 

“Men say the world’s cruel, and men say it’s mean.
But my friend, he died before the age of 18.

Such a young man, my friend.”

*********************************************

At the moment, “My Friend” is not available on YouTube.
You can listen to “Why Must It Be” here:

 

And while you’re here, check out the other posts on the Savage Lost blog.

 

Sep 05

The First Deep City Related 45, and Miami Girl Group Confusion!

questionmark_rsz


DIAMONETTES and OTHER DILEMMAS

It’s not always easy to tell the story of an artist, or the records they created.   Sometimes every answer just brings another question, with clarity never really showing up for the ride.   It reminds me of George Harrison’s insightful line, borrowed from the Tao Te Ching:  “The farther one travels, the less one knows.”

I now know more about the Diamonettes from Florida.    I also know less about them.    This is one very convoluted story!

 

 

Dig?  Yes, we do.

Dig? Yes, we do.

 

Fans of passionate, almost desperate deep soul, are familiar with a record by the Diamonettes, released on both the Dig and Alston labels in 1970.   What they don’t know is that the record wasn’t by the Diamonettes at all!  Exactly who it was, and which take they got, depends on which pressing of the record they have.  It could be a different local girl group, or it could be the14-year-old daughter of the man who started the Twist craze!

The first use of the Diamondettes/Diamonettes name came way back in 1959.   Florida A&M student and aspiring record mogul Johnny Pearsall shared co-writer’s credits on two songs that were released on the very-independent Orange & Green label.  Orange and green are Florida A&M’s colors, and after acquiring this record, it wasn’t hard to figure out that the Modern Jazz Masters, who provided the instrumental backing, were members of the FAMU marching band.   “Love Of My Dreams” is pretty good doo wop – after all, it was still the ‘50s – while the flip, “Goodby My Love”,  is in more of an early rhythm & blues vein.    All in all, a very good, and very rare early effort, and one shrouded in mystery — until the filming of Deep City:  The Birth of the Miami Sound.   Minds were blown on a Thursday afternoon, when Pearsall’s long-time music biz partner, Willie Clarke, was listening to some Miami soul records on my upstairs turntable.  You should have seen his face when “Love Of My Dreams” came on!

“That’s mine,” he yelled.   “I produced that!   In Miami!   Where’d you get that?”

Clarke’s name was left off the label, but as the song played on and long lost memories came flooding back, it was clear he was telling the truth.   Hearing this song for the first time in 55 years brought back one more memory, as he heard the lead female voice.   “That’s Helene!   Helene Smith!”   In that moment, a mysterious ’50s doo wop 45 with no back story revealed a future soul legend’s first recording, with one hell of a back story!

 

This humble local recording  might be the most historic local release of the pre-soul music era.

This humble local recording might just be the most historic  Miami R&B record.

 

In a few more years,  Willie Clarke and Johnny Pearsall would co-found labels such as Lloyd and Deep City.  Both labels would thrive in a Miami soul scene dominated by WAME and WMBM radio stations, and local venues such as the Knight Beat, Mr. James, Island Club, and Continental Club.  Pearsall (the business guy) and Clarke (the genius songwriter and producer) hooked up with names that are considered greats today – Clarence Reid, Little Beaver, Paul Kelly – but back then, most of those artists were just kids who were trying to make a career out of what they enjoyed the most.    Soon Clarke would discover Betty Wright, bringing the artist roster to new heights… but it wasn’t enough just to have talented artists.   Great records were a must… and great records depended on many things, among them songs and production.

 

Betty Wright and other talented locals, opening for Eddie Floyd in Fort Lauderdale.  This ad originally appeared in the Miami Times.  Click on the image to view it full size.

Betty Wright and other talented locals, opening for Eddie Floyd in Fort Lauderdale. This ad originally appeared in the Miami Times. Click on the image to view it full size.

 

Songs were never a problem.   Willie Clarke and Clarence Reid formed a partnership that would last for decades, and would result in some of the best songs in the history of soul music.    Clarke also had an ear for production, which amounted to making the artist and the song both sound the best that they can.   That took imagination and creativity, but it also took great musicians (no problem, thanks to Frank Williams’ Rocketeers) and great background singers.    Willie Clarke’s background harmonizers of choice:  the Rollers, the Coronettes, and yes, you guessed it, the Diamonettes.

Now fast forward again, this time to 1970.   The Clarke-Pearsall partnership had split for good, with Clarke and Reid now lending their talents to Henry Stone’s record labels.    The duo brought a group of high school kids into the studio to record two songs they had written, “Don’t Be Surprised” and “Rules Are Made To Be Broken”.   The real Diamonettes had split by then, so Clarke and Reid decided it would be okay to use their name for the recording – even though the girls weren’t the Diamonettes at all.    They were actually The Rollers, from Opa-Locka!  The girls cut the tracks for the local Dig label, which at the time was also the home of Jimmy “Bo” Horne and J.P. Robinson.   When Atlantic Records showed an interest in the record, it was shifted over to the Alston label… but somebody goofed, in a big way.   If you think the story is getting confusing, you ain’t heard nothing yet.

 

diamonettesdont_alston

 

The Diamonettes (who weren’t really the Diamonettes) were not the only ones to record “Don’t Be Surprised”.   14-year-old Lynn Williams was also given the song, by her producer/manager Arnold Albury… using the same backing track as the Diamonettes’ version.   The two masters were so similar that somebody must have become confused, because Williams’ vocal was used on some pressings of the Alston Diamonettes 45!   I recently asked Lynn Williams if she was ever in the Diamonettes, or even in the studio with them, and she told me the answer was no.   Since it was the B-side, it’s not clear if anyone was even aware of the mistake at the time!

 

"Don't Be Surprised" if there are more questions than answers about records such as this.

Don’t be surprise (sic) if there are more questions than answers about records such as this.

 

Lynn Williams (the daughter of music legend Hank Ballard and WMBM personality Vanilla Williams) would go on to record for Henry Stone’s Dade and TK labels, and recently sang in public again for the first time in more than thirty years.    The girls who recorded as the Diamonettes finally have a record out under their real name, thanks to a 45 issued recently by the folks at the Numero Group.

 

The first Rollers 45.   Or was it?

The first Rollers 45. Or was it?

 

coronetteswedding

 

I mentioned the Coronettes earlier, and their story just adds to the confusion.   After all these years it’s become hard for Willie Clarke to differentiate between the Coronettes and (real) Diamonettes, and how the Rollers also play into their stories.  After a while, it all started to run together.   Keep in mind that at the time, no one had any clue that anybody would care 50+ years later, so this sort of trivia, predictably, wasn’t and still isn’t in the forefront of anyone’s mind.

With Clarke’s help, I contacted Janet Albury of the Coronettes, who shed a little light on their story.  The Coronettes were Albury (then known as Leona Welch), Heiti Williams, Elizabeth Ann Welch, Mary Gatlin (who was Dave Prater of Sam & Dave’s niece), and Patti Jo Demps.  That last name should be familiar to ’70s soul music fans, through her work with the great writer/producer Curtis Mayfield.   Patti Jo, whose big break was replacing Melba Moore in the Broadway musical Purlie, would go on to record a couple of songs for the Scepter and Wand labels (“Ain’t No Love Lost” and “Make Me Believe In You”) that are now highly regarded in the soul music collecting world.  She was also the “PJ” in PJ Smith & Company, whose ’70s crossover recording “Hold On To It” is also popular these days.

 

Early promotional picture.  Note the spelling of her name as Patty Jo.

Early promotional picture. Note the spelling of her name as Patty Jo.

 

The label to this rare Coronettes acetate survived, but unfortunately the record does not play.

The label to this rare Coronettes acetate survived, but unfortunately the record does not play.

 

Back in the early ’60s, Patti Jo and the Coronettes were just getting their feet wet, recording demos such as “Booty Green” and “On Our Wedding Day” that would never get released.   One of their demos, “Something In The Milk Ain’t Clean”, did manage to get some local soul airplay, and has supposedly been used on some TV or radio show… according to both Janet Albury and Willie Clarke.   (There’s a theory that someone might have stolen the demo from the studio and passed it on to someone else.   Since I have no first-hand knowledge, I can’t really say what’s going on, but it’s just one more strange turn in what was already a strange story.)

There are still a lot of loose ends to all this (of course!) —  from the real Diamonettes, to a mysterious 45 by a Miami Central High grad named Zandra Reaves, to a trio known as Friday, Saturday & Sunday.  For now, let’s toast the early days of Helene Smith, Patti Jo, Lynn Williams, and others whose humble beginnings led to some great, enduring soul music classics.

 

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY
These are all songs, or records that were mentioned in the above blog post.

 

CORONETTES
On Our Wedding Day
Booty Green
(Stereo Sound Studios acetate)

CORONETTES
Something In The Milk Ain’t Clean
(no vinyl details are available at this time)

DIAMONDETTES AND MODERN JAZZ MASTERS
Love Of My Dreams
Goodby My Love (sic)
(Orange & Green 0607/0608)

DIAMONETTES
Don’t Be Surprised
Rules Are Made To Be Broken
(Dig 902)
(Note the change in spelling from the much earlier group)

DIAMONETTES
Rules Are Made To Be Broken
Don’t Be Surprised
(Alston 4590)
(Note the A and B sides have been reversed, as per Atlantic Records)

Click image to view it full size

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PATTI JO
Ain’t No Love Lost
Stay Away From Me
(Scepter 12366)

PATTI JO
Make Me Believe In You
Keep Me Warm
(Wand 11255)

ROLLERS
Knocking At The Wrong Door
One Little Piece
(Deep City/Numero ES-001)
(Recent vinyl issue of previously unreleased tracks)

 

Click image to view it full size

Click image to view it full size

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.J. SMITH & CO.
Hold On To It
Hey Mister
(Shane 100)
(P.J. was Patti Jo;  Smith was Barry Smith.   The pair had previously worked together in the Gospel Jazz Singers, a popular group at the Wreck Bar inside the Castaways Motel.)

LYNN WILLIAMS
Don’t Be Surprise (sic)
How Can You Call Love Fascination
(Suncut 1008)

Now that you’re here, please check out the other posts on the Savage Lost blog.

Oct 07

Paul Revere and the Raiders: The Miami Connection

raidersaction

 

Paul Revere and the Raiders paid their dues around the Pacific Northwest for many years, before landing a starring role on TV’s “Where The Action Is”.   That exposure helped make them one of the most successful bands in the United States.   It also meant the start of a South Florida connection that would last for a long, long time.

Steve Alaimo was a pop singer who came close to the national Top 40 several times, but never was able to score an elusive million seller.  When Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars came through Miami, with a sudden need for a backing band, Alaimo and the Redcoats stepped in like the pros they were, saving the day for Clark and his talented cavalcade.  Clark never forgot this and paid Alaimo back by making him the musical director on “Where The Action Is”.   For Alaimo, it also meant constant exposure to series regulars Paul Revere & the Raiders.

The Raiders had a great year in 1966, with hits such as “Just Like Me”, “Kicks”, and “Hungry”.   Unlike many bands whose albums consisted of hastily-recorded covers, the Raiders wrote a lot of tunes — GOOD tunes — that were not getting much notice tucked away on albums .  Raiders lead singer Mark Lindsay teamed up with Alaimo and future Raiders bass player Keith Allison, in an “Action” side project they called the Unknowns.   Their first single, a remake of the Raiders album track “Melody For An Unknown Girl”, reached #74 on the Billboard Hot 100, but did considerably better in Miami, peaking at #13 on WQAM and #25 on WFUN.  With both the Raiders and Allison signed to Columbia, and Alaimo signed to ABC, the guys had to keep their identities secret (thus, the Unknowns!)  Here we had three regulars on a network music show with a nationally-charted song… that they could not promote!

The Unknowns had the 13th biggest song in Miami in October 1966.  Click the image to view it full screen.  (Thanks to 560.com)

The Unknowns had the 13th biggest song in Miami in October 1966.  Click the image to view it full screen. (Thanks to 560.com)

 

Don't tell the folks at Columbia and ABC that the boys have a hit on Parrot.

Don’t tell the folks at Columbia and ABC that the boys have a hit on Parrot.

 

For their second release, the Unknowns went with Alaimo’s own Marlin record label.   “Tighter” was a good rockin’ version of another Mark Lindsay/Raiders album cut, with a Lindsay original, “Young Enough To Cry”, on the B-side.   Unlike “Melody For An Unknown Girl”, this release failed to get airplay, even in South Florida.  “Action” was cancelled, Allison joined the Raiders, and Alaimo went to Memphis to record… and that was that.

 

The second release, on Steve Alaimo's Marlin label.

The second release, on Steve Alaimo’s Marlin label.

 

In 1970, Paul Revere & the Raiders (with Lindsay and Allison) returned to Miami, where they were booked into a Sunny Isles club called The Hump.   Alaimo came to see them, and joined them on stage, making for an Unknowns reunion of sorts.   But more importantly, Revere got to witness a local group called the Peach, which was starting to get some attention in South Florida.   The Peach would play a major role in the future of the Raiders.

 

A successful week for the Raiders, at the Hump... as reviewed in Newsical Magazine.

A successful week for the Raiders, at the Hump… as reviewed in Newsical Magazine.  Click on image to view it full size.

 

Just as major league baseball teams have farm clubs — a minor league system that brings young talent to the big club — Paul Revere & the Raiders had a farm club of sorts in Don & the Goodtimes, a Portland, Oregon group that always seemed to be one step away from the big time.  Raiders such as Jim “Harpo” Valley and Charlie Coe came out of the Goodtimes.   But by the time the ’70s rolled around, Revere’s new “farm club” was the Peach.   In 1972 he recruited guitarist Bob Wooley and drummer Omar Martinez, both of whom had impressed earlier at the Hump.   Both would be on board when Paul Revere & the Raiders hooked up once again with Steve Alaimo, who was now vice president of TK Records.   The boys tried their hand at disco, with “Ain’t Nothin’ Wrong” (written by KC & the Sunshine Band) and “You’re Really Sayin’ Something” (a Bob Wooley original, with some help from Clarence Reid.)  The record failed to catch on, and the boys soon abandoned disco… though they would later enlist the services of a guy who’d previously recorded with TK Records hit-makers Foxy.

 

The Raiders turn to the Miami TK Records team to try to get a hit record.  This B-side was written by former Peach guitarist Bob Wooley and the great soul writer Clarence Reid.

The Raiders turned to the Miami TK Records team to try to get a hit record. This B-side was written by former Peach guitarist Bob Wooley and the great soul writer Clarence Reid.

A former member of Miami's YEAR 2000 would help to stabilize the group.

A former member of Miami’s YEAR 2000 would help to stabilize the group.

 

Revere shaped the band for the next two decades when he brought in Carl Driggs as lead vocalist.  Prior to Foxy, Driggs started to make a name for himself with Kracker, a band on the same label as Three Dog Night, with the same producer as Traffic and the Rolling Stones.   Kracker never did hit the big time, nor did earlier Driggs bands such as Year 2000 (South Florida favorites with an album on the Rama Rama label, and a 45 on Amy.) The addition of Driggs helped to stabilize the band.   The hit records had stopped, but the Raiders remained popular as a touring group, something that never wavered on and up to Paul Revere’s death in October 2014.

If the Raiders ever make it into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, it will certainly be the classic ’60s line-up that gets the attention… as it should.   But let’s not forget the decades of music, fun, and entertainment that the Raiders brought us after the hits dried up.   South Florida played a role in those years, even if it seems like just a footnote in the overall history of the group.   Paul Revere is gone now, and kicks just keep getting harder to find… but for fans of the Raiders, the music will always live on.

 

Now that you’re here, check out the other posts in the SAVAGE LOST blog.

 

Aug 08

Remembering HENRY STONE, 1921-2014

 

Miami music legend Henry Stone

Miami music legend Henry Stone

He taught us the value of perseverance… the importance of distribution… and the results that come from greasing the right palms at the right time.

In his 93 years, Henry Stone rewrote the rule book on how to get a hit record.   Sometimes he threw out the rule book entirely.   He showed the world that instead of just merely standing on the shoulders of giants, he could rise to become a giant himself in the record industry.

Every recap of Stone’s life will be filled with stories of how he launched TK Records, and made it the number one independent disco label in the world.   It was a remarkable achievement, but it came nearly thirty years into the man’s career in the biz.  It was a long way from pressing up demos that he’d distribute out of the back of a car.   It was a long way from those lean years when he would take his latest blues records around to seedy juke joints and whorehouses, anywhere so-called “race records” could be played.    I would hear stories from my father, who worked in the coin-operated machine business and would sometimes accompany Stone, filling jukeboxes with records by folks such as Little Iris Culmer  — records that are worth a fortune today.

Along the way Stone recorded tracks by Ray Charles, Wilbert Harrison, Lightning Hopkins, John Lee Hooker, and even James Brown… whose voice was removed from the 1959 jam “(Do The) Mashed Potatoes” and replaced by the vocal shouts of WMBM disc jockey Carlton “King” Coleman.    The success of “Mashed Potatoes” (with no small help from WINZ disc jockey Bob Greene, who got a cut of the publishing) helped finance more recordings, including the very first tracks recorded by future soul superstars Sam & Dave.   The list of early R&B and soul artists recorded by Stone is truly mind boggling.   With the help of his right hand man, Steve Alaimo, Stone branched out into what are now known as garage band recordings, releasing material by groups such as the Birdwatchers, the Nightcrawlers, the Senders, Proctor Amusement Company, the 31st of February, Mercy, and early studio tracks by Duane & Gregg Allman.   The records were impressive, but a lot of folks put out records.   What set Stone apart was distribution.   This is such an important point that I’ll say it again (and again and again).    Distribution was the key.    Stone was the man to see for independent labels, both large and small.  Without distribution, record stores (and in those days, drug stores and department stores) couldn’t get their hands on most of the records guys like Bob Greene and King Coleman were playing, so independent label artists — and their records — would have been doomed to failure.  With Stone’s Tone Distributors acting as a one-stop operation, small labels had an outlet to get their music into stores, and Stone himself had a way of getting his releases into the hands of those who decided which records would get played.   It was a win-win.

When a Henry Stone release would take off locally, he would make a distribution deal with a larger indie — usually Atlantic.   Atlantic would then use their powerful A&R network to secure national airplay.   Atlantic scored big profits from two major Henry Stone releases in 1971 — “Clean Up Woman” by Betty Wright and “Funky Nassau” by the Beginning of the End — but soon entered into a deal to join forces with Warner Brothers and Elektra Records.  With Atlantic falling from the ranks of indie labels, the whole dynamic had changed.  By the following year, Stone had enough of sharing the profits.   After picking up Timmy Thomas’ “Why Can’t We Live Together” from the tiny Konduko label, and transferring it to his own Glades imprint, Stone decided to handle national distribution himself.   It worked.   The record was a smash, without the help of Atlantic.   Stone learned he could do it himself.  That was Stone’s genius — distribution.   It was also the birth of TK Productions, an independent company that could distribute dozens upon dozens of small labels.   Soon labels such as Malaco, which had been cranking out unsuccessful records for a decade, would score huge with Dorothy Moore;   ditto Juana Records with Anita Ward’s “Ring My Bell”.   Sure, TK was (mainly) about disco, but here’s the real truth:   TK was about distribution!   It was about cutting the right record for the right moment, and then getting it in the hands of the right people.   It was that simple!

In recent years, Stone admitted to handing out payola — lots of it.   That’s how the record industry worked.   It still does — only today it’s more likely to be gifts masquerading as advertising revenue, or Christmas gifts to the wife.   Stone’s candor in how he manipulated Billboard Magazine into keeping KC & The Sunshine Band’s #1 song streak alive is refreshing.   Moralize or judge all you want — the music industry is a game, and the guys who know how to play it come out ahead, and Stone knew the game inside and out.    (He would have been the first one to tell you that a bad record was not going to sell, no matter how much money you throw at it.)   The real key to his longevity was not the gifts and money he gave out, but the talent of his artists and staff.   The songs that Clarence Reid and Willie Clarke cranked out for Stone’s labels such as Dade, Alston, Cat, and Blue Candle are true soul classics, appreciated today more than ever among record collectors.   The combination of great writers and producers with “hit” material, great knowledge of distribution, and a little something extra on top, made Henry Stone a legend in the music business.

TKmiamisound

 

TK’s bread and butter was disco, and when that genre started to fade, it was slow to keep up with the changes that were happening on the airwaves.  After the label crashed and burned in 1981, Henry Stone moved on to other ventures, embracing hip hop, Miami bass, freestyle, and other forms of dance music.   In recent years he’s been reissuing many of his classic recordings, and I’ve had a chance to work with him on some of those.  Even as his eyesight failed and his 93-year-old body betrayed him, his mind remained sharp.   He shared many interesting stores at a panel discussion in 2012 at the Miami Art Museum.    He’s shared even more through his writings, and for an upcoming documentary about his life and career.    That life may have ended, but his legacy lives on as we spin his records.  Here are just a few that we will continue to appreciate:

DOO WOP:  “Dry Your Eyes” by the Delmiras, “”Tears In My Eyes” by the Tru-Tones, “Nitey Nite” by the Majestics
ROCKABILLY:  “Kitten” by Jimmy Voytek, “Only One” by Don “Red” Roberts
NORTHERN SOUL:  “I Can’t Sleep” by Jimmy Bo Horne;  “I Can’t See Him Again” by the Twans;  “Stop Hurting Me Baby” by Purple Mundi
FUNK:  “Save Me” by James Knight & the Butlers;  “It Takes Two” by Lynn Williams”, “Across The Track” by the Believers
GARAGE BANDS:  “Girl I Got News For You” by the Birdwatchers;  “The Little Black Egg” LP by the Nightcrawlers;  “What’s Your Sister’s Name” by the Senders
THE SOUL HITS:   “Girls Can’t Do What The Guys Do” & “Clean Up Woman” by Betty Wright;  “Nobody But You Babe” by Clarence Reid
DISCO:  “Rock Your Baby” by George McCrae, “Rockin’ Chair” by Gwen McCrae, “Do You Wanna Get Funky With Me” by Peter Brown, many by KC & The Sunshine Band

Those are just a few of the literally thousands of recordings that received the Henry Stone seal of approval.   Stone was part of a bygone era of record guys that lived and breathed the business, but also had golden ears.   It wasn’t about focus groups or glitzy videos or social media mobilization or search engine optimization.    It was about both style and substance.   For that, we celebrate Henry Stone, and we will continue to do so.   They truly don’t make ’em like him anymore.

Henry Stone (seated, right) taking part in a music business panel discussion, April 2012

Henry Stone (seated, right) taking part in a music business panel discussion, April 2012. L-R: DJ LeSpam, Willie Clarke, Jeff Lemlich, Henry Stone.

 

 

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